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post #106 of 292


I never paid attention to Indian music before this. You get Asha Bhosle, the Kronos Quartet, and Rahul Dev Burman in one shot.

ALBUM: 4.5

The Kronos Quartet has been confounding purists and expectations with their commissions and collaborations for years, but this one has to be among their most adventurous yet. For You've Stolen My Heart, they collaborated with Asha Bhosle, one of India's best-loved singers, to pay tribute to R.D. Burman, India's most renowned film composer. Burman was both brilliant and prolific, and had a knack for incorporating nearly any and every style of music into his works.

Not only that, but he was a sonic technician/alchemist who invented or discovered, then incorporated, all manner of sound and tape effects into the songs as well. The band looked to Burman's originals for the arrangements rather than commissioning new ones, but in order to do this correctly the core quartet was going to need some help. So in addition to Asha Bhosle on vocals for much of the program, previous collaborators Wu Man and Zakir Hussain figure prominently into the sound.

In addition, besides their customary stringed instruments, the members of Kronos add farfisa, synthesizers, accordion, electric bass, percussion, theremin, and more! With all this going on, multi-tracking is obviously a necessity, but beyond the different instruments there are places where the strings got "massive overdubs" to achieve a lush string section, and others where experiments with bowing technique and microphone placement add odd tonal qualities.

Add to that Wu Man's pipa and electric sitar(!), and this is clearly not your average classical recording. Despite his penchant for experimentation and musical cannibalism, Burman's compositions are no novelty. His songs are deeply melodic and beautiful, and some are so catchy you may find yourself singing along. Asha Bhosle still has a great voice; it's hard to believe she was 70 at the time of these sessions.

And what can you say about the Kronos Quartet? After more than 30 years, they continue to push the boundaries and continue to put out exciting records. You've Stolen My Heart: Songs from R.D. Burman's Bollywood is an absolute triumph.
post #107 of 292
In the past few years the Kronos Quartet has been making one "World Music" album after another, and most of these have received good reviews, to my amazment. The album Nuveo (which purports to be a cross-section of Mexican musical culture), for example, is often hailed as "a daring foray", "experimental" and "richly textured", but I find it half-baked and confusing. The only good thing on the said album is Sensemaya by Silvestre Revueltas, which is a bona-fide classical work by a modern composer. This said, I'll look out for a cheap copy of You've Stolen My Heart.

For a classicist's adventure into World Music, I find the Silk Road project by Yo-yo Ma more musically satisfying.
post #108 of 292
In my opinion, Yo-Yo Ma and Kronos Quartet are definitely polar opposites. Kronos being on the Avante-Garde side of the spectrum. With that said, I agree with you on "Nuevo".

For those with yourmusic accounts. You can get "You've Stolen My Heart: Songs" for $6.00.
post #109 of 292
technobarbie: that isn't the latest of Amadou & Mariam is it? Isn't there latest Dimanche A Bamako? Also speaking of uzbekistan, ever heard of sevara nezarkhan?
post #110 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by antiant
technobarbie: that isn't the latest of Amadou & Mariam is it? Isn't there latest Dimanche A Bamako? Also speaking of uzbekistan, ever heard of sevara nezarkhan?
I don't have the latest. The one I listed was their second album released in the late 90's I believe. Unfortunately I haven't heard of Sevara Nezarkhan yet.
post #111 of 292
Now that butchered the concept of world music here’s another one. Think Delirium’s Karma.



Amazon

AMG 3 Stars

Because of its tranquil, hypnotic nature, some reviewers described o earthly gods as a new age release. But truth be told, Govinda's largely instrumental experiments have a lot more bite and edge than most of the instrumental music that was considered new age in the 1980s and 1990s. This often intoxicating, if a bit uneven, CD isn't really new age, but is best described as an interesting blend of electronica and world music.

Uniting his Gypsy violin and chants with synthesizers, sequencers, and scattered samples, Govinda is especially fond of modal playing and draws heavily on the modal styles of India, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, North Africa and Spain. In fact, he shows us the parallels between Spain's Gypsy flamenco and the raga music of India.

But he's also fond of Celtic music, and takes us to Ireland and Scotland on "Celtica." Not perfect but chance-taking and unorthodox, o earthly gods demonstrated that Govinda had a lot of potential.
post #112 of 292
Technobarbie: the description on the Govinda CD sounds like the album Gypsy Soul by a guy called Ashik. It may not be easy to find nowadays, probably been taken out of print. But this is a creative, virtuosic take on traditions from Hunguary to American Bluegrass, and is wonderful from start to finish.



Another violinist that takes the multi-ethnic approach is Doug Cameron, although I've yet to get any of his CDs.
post #113 of 292
Still feels like adding some comments on classical musicians' crossover to the world/ethnic music circle.

For a while, I had considered Itzhak Perlman as the classical musician who has the most innate, complete understanding and rapport with traditional music. I was utterly impressed by his Live In the Fiddler's House, in which he collaborated with some of the most important groups in the current Klezmer scene -- the Klezmatics, Brave Old World, the Klezmer Conservatory Band. Perlman's command of the Klezmer idiom was convincing, his touch delicate and full of emotion. And it was only the ravishing tone of his expensive instrument that set him apart from his folk associates. Listening to the explosive finale, you'd bet that everyone derived immense joy from this collaboration.

This harmonious facade, unfortunately, turned out to be illusionary. After reading some of the participating band's comments on the event, I wouldn't want to touch this CD -- and I have avoided anything by Perlman ever since.

The next classical violinist to pick up Klezmer music was Nigel Kennedy, who collaborated with the Polish band Kroke on the album East Meets East. Unlike the Perlman, I can recommend this album with good conscience.



Kennedy, despite his defiant antics, is much less self-conscious than Perlman: most of the time his instruments (classical and electric violins) blends perfectly into the dynamic music. Certainly he has chosen his partner wisely: Kroke, incidentally, is a band that often plays like a classical piano trio. As expected from Kennedy, there are a few instances of genre bashing -- like the electric guitar-dominated T 4.2; but all in all, this is a consistent and enjoyable modern Klezmer CD.

If there is not reason enough to get this album: Natasha Atlas sings on the first track.
post #114 of 292
[QUOTE=antiant]bought some more albums (4 in all, 2 of which belong in this thread), so without further adieu...


Gigi - Gold & Wax




Hey Ant...
Impecable taste as always...Picked this up myself whilst visiting NYC over the 4th July holiday..She hasn't missed a beat has she?
post #115 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by FalconP



If there is not reason enough to get this album: Natasha Atlas sings on the first track.
That is a nice recording and the first track is my favorite. That album is also on yourmusic.com I believe for $6.00. I agree and it seems to me that Kennedy usually includes a few offbeat pieces in most of his recordings to my disliking.

I'll need to checkout the Gypsy Soul CD as well. Thanks.
post #116 of 292
For those who can't find the GiGi recording, it's available on emusic.com. Thanks for the recommendation.
post #117 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by NacMacFeegle
Hey Ant...
Impecable taste as always...Picked this up myself whilst visiting NYC over the 4th July holiday..She hasn't missed a beat has she?
thanks, you know we're always in the same boat with this topic , no she hasn't missed a beat, this is my first album from her, although i've heard her on some bill laswell stuff (absolutely LOVE bill laswell)...i was suprised to find it in the record store (didn't know she was coming out with a new record) and had to pick it up, i'd like to get her previous albums too, if you have them by any chance, how are they?
post #118 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by antiant
thanks, you know we're always in the same boat with this topic , no she hasn't missed a beat, this is my first album from her, although i've heard her on some bill laswell stuff (absolutely LOVE bill laswell)...i was suprised to find it in the record store (didn't know she was coming out with a new record) and had to pick it up, i'd like to get her previous albums too, if you have them by any chance, how are they?
I sure do have them and they are wonderful...There is also an Axiom Records CD she guests on (with the mighty Bill and Jah Wobble) and at the moment (I'm at work and said CD is at home) the title escapes me..I think its Radio Axiom or some such. I should just look up AMG and get back to you
post #119 of 292
cool, that would be great...nac you ever heard of this one: Gigi - Abyssinia Infinite? I've also seen some of her stuff on CDBaby Gigi - One Ethiopia her discography is a little "out of order" but i've heard a few songs on the Abyssinia Infinite from the site i posted and it's really nice, her voice is really amazing
post #120 of 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by antiant
cool, that would be great...nac you ever heard of this one: Gigi - Abyssinia Infinite? I've also seen some of her stuff on CDBaby Gigi - One Ethiopia her discography is a little "out of order" but i've heard a few songs on the Abyssinia Infinite from the site i posted and it's really nice, her voice is really amazing
One Ethiopia was her first US ( I think so anyway) release...haven't been able to find it, but thanks for the nudge toward CDBaby..I'll check them out, although I usually have better luck going thru CDUniverse. I have Abyssinia Infinite and its just fine listening. Also have Gigi and Illuminated Audio and of those two I'd pick Illuminated Audio. In fact I think thats her best yet - very dreamy.
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