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"Dolby Headphone" software rocks but... - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by Calanctus
What's interesting is that you don't need to own the Denon to get the benefit of DH, at least according to their literature. You can listen to files encoded for DH with the Denon on other players.
At this point, email might be a better way to continue this line of conversation.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by kelly

At this point, email might be a better way to continue this line of conversation.
I was going to propose a service, whereby someone with this receiver could get files by email, and, for a fee, encode them with DH and email back...I guess I won't make that suggestion.
post #18 of 29
I found some more interesting Dolby Headphone gear: And here are some of the available chipsets: Sony also makes a chip, but I couldn't find any info on it.

kerelybonto
post #19 of 29
By the way, the prices on the Marantz and Sharp are street -- MSRP were $3000 and $1500, respectively. Also, the Marantz is only available in Europe and Japan, and the Sharp is only available in Japan.

The prices I put up for the Lake products is also street, but there's less of a difference -- the HSM5.1 lists for $500 and I'm not sure what the HSM6240 suggests for.

kerelybonto
post #20 of 29
(...Kelly puts TheaterPhone on wish list.)
post #21 of 29
I just finished watching Pearl Harbor via its Dolby Headphone track on the Sony S7000 > modded ART DI/O > Sugden Headmaster > Senn HD600.

Very cool. This was my first time to watch an entire film in Dolby Headphone and I was very impressed. Pearl Harbor was a loan and isn't really a film I'd rush out and buy, but I'd still been wanting to see it--as it turns out, it wasn't as bad to me as I'd feared it would be and I totally dug the air combat scenes.

The involvement via Dolby Headphone was really impressive. I think overall, I'd still prefer my NHT (VT-2/VS-2) home theater system, but for sitting in the computer room and/or watching late at night, this was not bad at all. This is really an ideal solution for someone on a space/money budget.

Also, anyone who has been following this thread would probably be interested in this one too:
http://www.head-fi.org/forums/showth...threadid=14671
post #22 of 29
I'll be on vacation for a fortnight from the the next weekend - I hope I can add something about the Sharp MD-MT200 (pmdr with dolby headphone) here, then.

Greetings from Munich!

Manfred / lini
post #23 of 29

Soo....

So how hard would it be to take one of these DH chipsets and turn it into one of the black boxes that so many of us would love?

Sure, it'll be a few steps past a CMOY in construction, but if it works...

Anyone up for a challenge?
post #24 of 29

Re: "Dolby Headphone" software rocks but...

Quote:
Originally posted by Zurg
I hate listening to music out of my laptop. It's incredibly noisy and generates lots of weird, distracting, transient sounds.
-z [/B]
Check out the M-Audio Sonica, it attaches via USB to a laptop or desktop and provides line out stereo and multichannel optical S/PDIF. Use it with a headphone amp and you get dead quiet in the quiet spots. S/N ratio is about 97dB if I remember correctly. It only costs $79 at Comp USA. I listen all the time at work with this. Since it is line out, you need an amp.

www.midiman.net

No affiliation, just a happy user.

Paste from website:

Audio Performance Specifications
- Dynamic Range: 97dB (typical -60dB input, A-weighted)
- Signal-to-Noise Ration 97 dB (typical, A-weighted)
- THD: -87dB (typical)
- Completely USB bus powered (no power supply required)
post #25 of 29
Quote:
So how hard would it be to take one of these DH chipsets and turn it into one of the black boxes that so many of us would love?
Probably a simple matter of removing the DSP chips/control logic and building a power supply ,then placing all in a suitable chassis.

but I for one would not rush to purchase a new receiver and then cannibalizing it.Most Dolby Headphone ready units are at the upper end of the receiver line
post #26 of 29
Well, I actually meant picking up one of the chips from an electronics dealer, thereby reducing the price substantially.
post #27 of 29
The "chips" are easily obtained DSP chips.The problem is the programming code which is only available by liscence,and that runs into major $$$$$$$$$$$$$$
post #28 of 29
doesn't anybody read the headwize frontpage?

Quote:
# 4/13/2002: Power Technology has released DFX6, a sound enhancement plugin for Winamp, MusicMatch, RealOne, RealPlayer, RealJukebox, Sonique, and J.River Media Jukebox media players. The major feature of this version is a new Headphones mode, which gives music a more natural sound in headphones. The list price is $29 US for each player-specific plugin or $39 for all player plugins. Until April 22, the plugins are on sale at 40% off.
anybody try this plugin?

and holy cow! aren't those the ath wooden phones on the dolby headphone webpage?!

http://www.dolby.com/dolbyheadphone/
post #29 of 29
First, a hello to all here. I'm checking this forums for a long time already, it's often fun to read!

I have heard both Dolby Headphone (through MusicMatch) and DFX6 (through Winamp). I never used any effects or equalizers, but Dolby Headphone impressed me too. Then, the DFX6 headphone mode is just a joke.

Hope Dolby Headphone will be plugged someday with Winamp or Media Jukebox. Who needs MusicMatch?

Hans
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