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I've never even held vinyl. - Page 4

post #46 of 63
ive never heard vinyl ethier but my dad has some old records just no player maybe i could get him reintrested as well. You hifi ppl really do a good job of convinceing my to give up my money lol but i enjoy it. I say go for it and tell me if you thought it was worth it.
post #47 of 63
Quote:
What I never understood is why a stylus would wear out. After all
you are dragging a piece of diamond across as plastic surface.
You would think the diamond would last a long time. Alas,
it to wears out.
for every action there is a reaction and even a "fixed" object will eventually wear when there is a "movable" surface interacting with it over time.

Just look at river gravel
post #48 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickcr42
for every action there is a reaction and even a "fixed" object will eventually wear when there is a "movable" surface interacting with it over time.

Just look at river gravel
see also "Grand Canyon, The"
post #49 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Publius
If you're hoping to spend $1/disc at stores, eg half price books, then you better like Menudo. =)
Damn, that's funny AND scary!
post #50 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Publius
Expecting to only pay a dollar a disc is just nuts.
It sounds like you are buying from record dealers. If you want someone to sort the records by artist, clean them, grade them, put them in a plastic bag, and haul them around for you to choose from, you are going to pay $5 to $10 a disk. But there are plenty of $1 and $2 disks to be had. On ebay, there are lots of dozens of records going for next to nothing all the time. Even shipped, media mail doesn't add that much to the cost. Some you end up chucking, and some you end up treasuring. That's the thrill of the hunt. It helps to have broad tastes in music and be willing to try something unknown. I have somewhere between 8 and 10,000 records, both LPs and 78s, and I paid about 30 cents apiece on the average. Heck, just tell your family and friends you are collecting records and people will give you their whole collections for free. Haul the ones you don't like down to the Goodwill and let another record collector take a crack at them.

Also, Menudo isn't the only thing in the dollar bins... you can find 50s exotica like Martin Denny & Les Baxter, spoken word and comedy, incredible classical records, entire operas, jazz reissues, classic country and 50s pop. If you want an original issue of Freak Out or Meet The Beatles, you are going to pay for it. But all that stuff is already on CD. LPs are more valuable for the music that has never been released on CD, and likely never will.

See ya
Steve
post #51 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot
Also, Menudo isn't the only thing in the dollar bins... you can find 50s exotica like Martin Denny & Les Baxter, spoken word and comedy, incredible classical records, entire operas, jazz reissues, classic country and 50s pop. If you want an original issue of Freak Out or Meet The Beatles, you are going to pay for it. But all that stuff is already on CD. LPs are more valuable for the music that has never been released on CD, and likely never will.
Agreed... and there's some fascinating stuff too (altho admittedly, with some of it you can see very clearly why it was never released on CD ).

The main "problem" I have with LP's (and it's not that serious of a problem) is that older records tend to have better sound, but older records also tend to have been heavily abused, dirt ground into the grooves, or otherwise be in crappy condition. Many of them can never be cleaned well enough to sound good. OTOH, there are many newer (70's and up) LP's that sound great... I'm really into 80s music and like it best on LP.
post #52 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by videocrew
stargirl,

have you actually heard good vinyl playback? not the fisher price turntable you think you know about, but real, hifi vinyl playback?

i'm a university student too. i cannot even begin to explain the difference between vinyl and cd in terms of stuff to listen to while i'm studying. cd is cool and all, but it's not "alive" sounding like vinyl is. listening to vinyl on my Rega P3 with Rega Super Bias and a Pro-Ject phono box is the most relaxing and immersing experience ever. add to that the overabundance of used record stores in my town and it has almost entirely replaced CD's in my listening habits.

i seriously recommend you sit down and listen to some solid, high quality vinyl playback before you start spouting off about clicks and pops being so horridly bothersome. the human brain minimizes spurious noise like that anyway, its not something your brain is designed to notice.
videocrew;

first of all, i'm in highschool, . second of all, i *have* heard vinyl - the clicks and pops dont bother me that much or even at all. if you actually took the time to read my posts before responding i said you probably wont even hear them anyways. dont put words in my mouth - i never said they were horrid or bothersome...or anything even similar that could be misinterpreted as horridly bothersome.

its cool that you decided to go vinyl - like i said, i was considering it for a long time too...but i've decided to stick with CD's because 1) i dont have the money to buy into vinyl b) i dont see what the big deal is about the way it sounds compared to a CD. c) I like the way a CD sounds. sure theres more involvement with playing a record, but i dont see how that helps you enjoy the music more.

anyways, like i keep saying i was simply giving the original poster reasons not to buy vinyl. i dont know why everyone keeps acting like its some sort of crime to not like vinyl over cds..




to others;
darn all you vinyl lovers!! its making me want to get into it again - well actually, no. i'm saving up for a trip to europe and some new guitar equipment. maybe when all that is done and i've got cash to burn i'll do it.

hehe, vinyl searching sounds like fun but i'll stick to scrounging for good music on CD's - there still so much to be heard in the CD world for me
but its cool that it goes for so cheap! i had no idea! when i looked on ebay, most of the stuff was like 3-8 bucks! not that that is expensive... but 25 cents a pop...thats what i call cheap.
post #53 of 63
I too am on the cusp of adding vinyl playing capabilities to my system. What I've heard is one reason vinyl can sound better is that since its mechanical it has infinite resolution, unlike CD's. Sorta like film camera vs. digital camera (digiatl cameras suck IMHO).

A friend of mine has a Rega and tube preamp he is willing to sell me for $500. How does this player compare to a Dual player?
post #54 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_tubes
What I've heard is one reason vinyl can sound better is that since its mechanical it has infinite resolution, unlike CD's. Sorta like film camera vs. digital camera (digiatl cameras suck IMHO).
Vinyl can sound just fine and preferring it to cd is perfectly ok.

But it does not have "infinite resolution". Do not believe anyone who says so! And no, samples are not "sound pixels" at all (intuitive as the idea may sound).


Regards,

L.
post #55 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot
It sounds like you are buying from record dealers. If you want someone to sort the records by artist, clean them, grade them, put them in a plastic bag, and haul them around for you to choose from, you are going to pay $5 to $10 a disk. But there are plenty of $1 and $2 disks to be had. On ebay, there are lots of dozens of records going for next to nothing all the time. Even shipped, media mail doesn't add that much to the cost.
But can eBay really be trusted that much for vinyl? The shipping requirements are that much higher. I did do a stint of eBay buying, and admittedly I did not get any bad discs and I was only ordering electronic stuff that was in some light demand. But I don't think it's like I can eBay 100 records for $50 and expect to be that much ahead after shipping (and shipping damage).

The local (and, apparantly, highly regarded) used record stores around Austin usually do not clean and resleeve the records, and they still average $3-$7. The only store I found that really takes the time to clean em up is Antone's, and you pay even more for that priviledge. (Admittedly I have not been to Sound on Sound or that new place in South Austin whose name escapes me, both of which are kind of botique.)

Quote:
Some you end up chucking, and some you end up treasuring. That's the thrill of the hunt. It helps to have broad tastes in music and be willing to try something unknown.
I guess I'm just not there yet with record buying. I'm focusing right now on fleshing out my collection with artists I need to listen to but don't want to spend money on new CDs for, but I have a hard time buying something I know absolutely nothing about.

That said, my list last weekend of artists I wanted to buy was about 50 artists long, so I have plenty more to buy as is.

Quote:
I have somewhere between 8 and 10,000 records, both LPs and 78s, and I paid about 30 cents apiece on the average. Heck, just tell your family and friends you are collecting records and people will give you their whole collections for free. Haul the ones you don't like down to the Goodwill and let another record collector take a crack at them.
Already did that. My dad provided the source for this collection.

Quote:
Also, Menudo isn't the only thing in the dollar bins... you can find 50s exotica like Martin Denny & Les Baxter, spoken word and comedy, incredible classical records, entire operas, jazz reissues, classic country and 50s pop. If you want an original issue of Freak Out or Meet The Beatles, you are going to pay for it. But all that stuff is already on CD. LPs are more valuable for the music that has never been released on CD, and likely never will.
Well, like I said, there is a lot of good stuff in the bargain bins, it just takes forever to find it. ie, I hit up probably the smallest Half Price Books in town last weekend, and I did hit the bins, and I was there for like an hour and a half or something, much of that time spent on the floor on the bins. For any store of any size, it almost becomes not worth my time to look at every single record in the store, if perhaps 0.1% of those records look good enough to buy even for $1.
post #56 of 63
If you want another reason not to go into vinyl, I'll give you one: cartridges.

They will drive you INSANE. You need to spend at least half an hour to two hours just aligning the things, and you may want to spend $60 in extra gear (stylus gauge + test LP) to get them right. They wear out after a few years. They may break IMMEDIATELY if you:
  • accidentally drop the arm on the plinth or platter, especially while installing one
  • have a cat play with the arm (true story)
  • clean it in the wrong direction
  • Use the wrong cleaner
  • move without protecting them

And you can't just ignore the things if you get an entry-level player, because they do eventually wear out, and some of these things that you could do could damage the vinyl if you ignore them. Finally, any decent one is going to run you at least $60-100.
post #57 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Publius
But can eBay really be trusted that much for vinyl?
I've bought over 2,000 records on ebay, and my limit is $2 after shipping... I usually pay half that. I've gotten MUCH more than what I paid for.

There are two ways to shop for records. One is to go for the stuff that hasn't hit the market before. People selling off a relative's collection, or their own records that have been sitting unplayed for twenty years. The other way is to buy from record dealers who buy up collections like this and sort them and sell them for many times what they paid for them.

If you are looking for specific records, you have to bite the bullet and pay the dealers. But if you are just looking for good music, you can take an overall look at a collection and judge whether it has potential or not. I have found incredible treasures mixed into batches I bought on ebay.

Media Mail is quite cheap too. The trick is getting the seller to box it well... especially fragile 78s.

See ya
Steve
post #58 of 63
What's the cheapest method of record cleaning for non-click/pop playback? In other words, the best bang for buck cleaner that doesn't require a vacuum & you can clean by hand? New to vinyl too.
post #59 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by sumone
What's the cheapest method of record cleaning for non-click/pop playback? In other words, the best bang for buck cleaner that doesn't require a vacuum & you can clean by hand? New to vinyl too.
Well... you used to be able to pick up a gadget on eBay that clamps over the record label, protecting it when it gets wet. If you can still find these (I don't have a clue) you can wash LP's in the sink with something like dish soap or something else that doesn't leave a film, and just leave 'em out to dry like dishes. This would be the best "bang for buck" (but requires VERY soft water in your area, + probably rinsing with distilled water) Otherwise, the Disc Doctor system is probably the best option.
post #60 of 63
Hey, I bought the same thing! I could dig up an email address if you want to ask about it.
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