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I've never even held vinyl. - Page 2

post #16 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by lini
Seems like your understanding of the word "compression" is pretty limited, then (maybe on compression as used in compressor devices for musicians?) - unless you want to nitpick that it should rather be decompression regarding bass on vinyl playback, but I don't think so. Read your own words:

If one would understand that as a form of frequency dependent electro-mechanical compression/decompression, I'd regard that as entirely correct. It's not the usual term for audio fans and musicians, but it's surely the right one for computer geeks. And I'm sure you'll find more of the latter on the web...

Greetings from Hannover!

Manfred / lini
I've always heard it referred to as preemphasis (during the record cutting) and deemphasis (on playback). It exists to reduce surface noise (the high frequencies are boosted to stand-out above the surface noise) and to make the grooves more compact/trackable (it reduces the bass so that the bass grooves are small enough that a decent amount of music can fit on a record and so that the stylus can track the bass without jumping out of the grooves from too much bass). (Also, just to nit-pick, it's done electronically (with low-pass filters or digital equalization) and not electromechanically on all but the cheapest (crystal/ceramic) cartridge types).

Quote:
Originally Posted by lini
GuffMorgan: In general, a well cared for record might very well outlast the original owner. As for the number of playbacks without impact on the sound, I'd say, if the equipment is good, a good record can be played back more often than one would ever want to listen to it.

Greetings from Hannover!

Manfred / lini
Yes. Just be sure to keep your stylus clean (I reccomend a stylus brush and Mr. Clean Magic Eraser), in alignment, and be replace it frequently (the standard eliptical stylus should last 300-500 hours, fine-line styli should last 500-800 hours, and more radical shapes can last as long as 1000 to 4000 hours (it depends on the actual shape). (NOTE: All those measurements assume that the stylus is clean, in alignment.) Also, in addition to alignment it is extremely important to get the azimuth right (on my last TT it was off by about 10 degrees and now I'm paying for it) and to make sure that the cartridge is tracking at about the right weight (I reccomend getting a Shure SFG-2 guage, or one of the $50 digital ones on eBay or Audiogon). By "right weight" I mean in the manufacturer's specified range. It is usually better to track heavier than lighter, because a mis-tracking cartridge (one that can't stay firmly seated in the groove, and just because a cartridge isn't skipping doesn't necessarily mean it isn't mistracking) will bounce all around the groove and cause damage to them.
post #17 of 63
Honestly, vinyl sounds a lot better on a turntable than held in your hand.
post #18 of 63
Ah, vinyl...those were the days. Used to write notes about what songs I liked & disliked on the sleeve. I wonder if they're floating around some thrift shop now!

Hey, is a CD still considered an "album," or is the term "album" only supposed to be applied to vinyl 33rpm records?

Thanks.
post #19 of 63
Aside from the sound and the fun, the artwork on the outer sleeves sure beats digital stuff too!
post #20 of 63
You know, your answers aren't really helping me in staying away from buying a vinyl rig. The only argument against I've got at the moment is the $$ of the initial setup.
post #21 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by lini
If one would understand that as a form of frequency dependent electro-mechanical compression/decompression, I'd regard that as entirely correct.
Thank you, Dr Science! But I think it's more understandable to the layman to refer to compression as a dynamic effect, and refer to equalization when we're talking about cuts and boosts in specific frequencies.

See ya
Steve
post #22 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuffMorgan
Generally, how long does a well cared for record last before the sound on it starts to go south?
I have records that are 40 years old and have been played thousands of times and they still sound like the day they were pressed. Records are designed to be played. If you take care of them and your turntable is adjusted properly, they'll outlive you.

See ya
Steve
post #23 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuffMorgan
You know, your answers aren't really helping me in staying away from buying a vinyl rig. The only argument against I've got at the moment is the $$ of the initial setup.
You can get a good used turntable from the 70s and it won't set you back more than a couple hundred dollars. Look for old Duals. They sell for very little and they're built like tanks. They sound great too.

See ya
Steve
post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot
You can get a good used turntable from the 70s and it won't set you back more than a couple hundred dollars. Look for old Duals. They sell for very little and they're built like tanks. They sound great too.

See ya
Steve
Well, if I'm to be talked into vinyl I'd want to spend a decent, but not ton, of money on it (since I'd probably only get vinyls of albums that I absolutely adore). Like I plan on probably buying a NAD C542 for my cd's, so I'd be willing to spend a comparible amount to that. I know this has probably been asked numerous numerous times and I could find an answer if I searched, but since I'm already talking about it here and I know I can get personalized answers... what all is needed for a vinyl rig (headphone use)?
post #25 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuffMorgan
Well, if I'm to be talked into vinyl I'd want to spend a decent, but not ton, of money on it (since I'd probably only get vinyls of albums that I absolutely adore). Like I plan on probably buying a NAD C542 for my cd's, so I'd be willing to spend a comparible amount to that. I know this has probably been asked numerous numerous times and I could find an answer if I searched, but since I'm already talking about it here and I know I can get personalized answers... what all is needed for a vinyl rig (headphone use)?
Check out the original AR-XA turntable........simple, belt driven, easy maintenance......a true classic. Here's one:
http://www.audioweb.com/Ad/AdInfo.asp?adid=157933
Aside from that, you'll need either a separate phono stage or an amp/receiver with a built in phono stage. I prefer vintage, such as this:
http://members.aol.com/KDresch/sx-750.html
Total cost, with shipping for this setup would probably be around $250.
post #26 of 63

LPs

Yes, they sound great and I still have some but I do not use them anymore. Cleaning then from the dust they accumulate (when charged they are electrostatic magnets) is a pain, and they clic and pop all the time.

Regards
post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuffMorgan
Well, if I'm to be talked into vinyl I'd want to spend a decent, but not ton, of money on it
Money and quality are not related with turntables. Back in the 1970s, turntable manufacturers were making really good equipment. A lot of these are now being sold used for next to nothing. I would rather have a $100 Dual 1228 from the 70s than just about any current $500 turntable. Since turntables are a niche market now, there are fewer mid-quality models... it's usually a choice between a cheaply made piece of junk, or a very pricey audiophile model. The mid quality turntables are the used ones, and they usually cost less than even the cheap quality new ones.

For a turntable setup, you'd need a turntable, a cartridge, a phono preamp and some sort of record cleaning arrangement. For $200, you can get a pretty darn good sounding setup if you buy smart. I'd recommend a used turntable, a new cartridge in the $50 to $100 range, a $20 phono preamp- or a used 70s preamp with a phono input, and the best record cleaning system you can afford... the low end being a record brush and the high end being a record washing machine.

Also, you say that you would only get records of music you know you like... That is overlooking the best thing about record collecting. Records are generally a dollar a disk and the selection of titles is mammoth. You can experiment and listen to a much wider variety of music on vinyl than you ever can on CD. When it comes to sound quality, mid 70s-80s music is usually better on CD. 50s - mid 70s usually sounds better on vinyl. Of course, there are plenty of exceptions to this...

See ya
Steve
post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot
For a turntable setup, you'd need a turntable, a cartridge, a phono preamp and some sort of record cleaning arrangement. For $200, you can get a pretty darn good sounding setup if you buy smart. I'd recommend a used turntable, a new cartridge in the $50 to $100 range, a $20 phono preamp- or a used 70s preamp with a phono input, and the best record cleaning system you can afford... the low end being a record brush and the high end being a record washing machine.
Heh, hard for me to buy smart since I'm not smart about turntables in the first place Examples of quality ones to keep my eye out for?
post #29 of 63
Just look for solid construction and simplicity. I have a Dual 1218, which is great for having three speeds and easily removable headshells, important for 78s. I also have a Thorens TD-165. They are both reasonably priced and good sounding.

See ya
Steve
post #30 of 63
Quote:
for classical, jazz and classic rock, nothing beats vinyl and a tube amp
My favorite is vinyl, an SS amp, but with tubes somewhere upstream either in a pre-amp or phono-pre.
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