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post #5056 of 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

 

To be contrary, I think this could change if gamers would vote with their wallet. The thing is is that a lot of gamers seem to be buying into what the publishers are peddling--they pre-order when they shouldn't, buy season passes when they shouldn't, buy launch-day DLC when they shouldn't, etc. The sorriest thing about the whole mess isn't the impact on consumers though--it's that it massively devalues games as art. It's a bit easier these days to side with with the 'games aren't art' position when this is the norm for the industry.

 

Your right that would make a big difference and I've been saying that same thing for years but in reality I don't see that happening, getting people to do that on a scale needed to make changes in the video game industry of that level just isn't going to happen but we can wish I guess Lol.  I've stopped paying top dollar on day one releases I now wait for that game to sell for 50 or 60% off or more sometimes it take a few months though..

post #5057 of 5065

Btw what you guys think about this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cML814JD09g

 

As a concept it looks promising.

post #5058 of 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by catspaw View Post
 

Btw what you guys think about this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cML814JD09g

 

As a concept it looks promising.

Now that....that was what they were saying about the future of gaming. VR taken to new heights.

 

Thing is, though, does the Void facility actually exist?

post #5059 of 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by thatBeatsguy View Post
 

Now that....that was what they were saying about the future of gaming. VR taken to new heights.

 

Thing is, though, does the Void facility actually exist?

Even if it does not, I assume it redefines "having a big enough home for your fun" :D.

Looking at this im thinking that if the technology is there, why not buy 1000 hectares out of a city and create this sort of world by yourself (I mean, its not like its expensive to put some cardboard walls... If anything the sensors would be).

 

While the facility might be there and also might be a great experience like that, making it profitable is another story.

Most gamers love gaming because they can do it at home, at will, any free time they got, with almost no cost.

A theme park where you have to pay a fee to play (and probably not a small one), where you can game for a certain amount of time, where the amount of games at your disposal is small (I assume this based on the inherent limitations of requiring a physical environment for each game) and most importantly you have to get there...

 

 

 

To see and live it once, yes. Not a form of entertainment that will last for long for the same individual.

 

It does however show the potential to change the world once the device is small enough to fit the entire world into your VR set. So it is pushing technology in the right direction if you ask me.


Edited by catspaw - 5/14/15 at 1:16am
post #5060 of 5065

I've been playing the new Wolfenstein Old Blood and am very surprised how good this game is, I'm enjoying it more then The new order and for only 20. can't go wrong it's well worth a try of course if one waits a few months probably get for half that..

post #5061 of 5065

Well, I totally meant to finish Divine Divinity before I moved onto another game, but Divinity is on pause, because I've quite accidentally managed to get sucked into The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt (2015). I'm a bit annoyed that it's getting the great reviews that it is--it's really a mess of a game, buggy and with some of the worst collision detection I've seen in a modern title. Additionally, the NPCs are beyond boring and barely interact with the world at all--the chance for meaningful or impressive gameplay situations being born out of interesting AI behavior or environmental situations is basically nil, unless by interesting you mean the NPCS falling through terrain, talking to inanimate objects, floating 30 feet above the road, intruding into cutscenes in a comical manner, or just being completely unable to navigate if you manage to push them off path. Couple these issues with the oddly paced and situated opening to the game and the mixed-bag art design that doesn't know if it wants to be dark and gritty medieval Europe or stereotypical male power fantasy and this ought to be a stinker, but luckily it overcomes many of its flaws by just being a hell of a lot of fun. If we are talking open-world action RPGs, this then is the sort that I'm looking for, rather than Skyrim. Here, the story takes greater focus, the side quests (thus far) are almost exclusively interlocked in ways that reward you for exploring and paying careful attention, the world design is far lovelier and natural feeling (less vertical, way more spread out), the production design is excellent in nearly every meaningful aspect, and the combat just feels right. It's not at all that 'whacking each other with pool noodles' feeling that I get from Skyrim. In sum, I think the game is pretty damn messy, but if you're in it for the big picture then it's hard to argue with this game's accomplishments. I'll offer more thoughts when I beat the game, if I ever do.

 

In the meantime, I'm really looking forward to Serpent in the Staglands, which is dropping tomorrow. No idea when I'm going to make time for it though, but I'll do my best to make time. Here's a trailer for it:

 

 

post #5062 of 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Well, I totally meant to finish Divine Divinity before I moved onto another game, but Divinity is on pause, because I've quite accidentally managed to get sucked into The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt (2015). I'm a bit annoyed that it's getting the great reviews that it is--it's really a mess of a game, buggy and with some of the worst collision detection I've seen in a modern title. Additionally, the NPCs are beyond boring and barely interact with the world at all--the chance for meaningful or impressive gameplay situations being born out of interesting AI behavior or environmental situations is basically nil, unless by interesting you mean the NPCS falling through terrain, talking to inanimate objects, floating 30 feet above the road, intruding into cutscenes in a comical manner, or just being completely unable to navigate if you manage to push them off path. Couple these issues with the oddly paced and situated opening to the game and the mixed-bag art design that doesn't know if it wants to be dark and gritty medieval Europe or stereotypical male power fantasy and this ought to be a stinker

 

I agree, but in addition I don't find it's dumbed down hack and slash mechanics to be any fun.  Plus, like its predecessors it doesn't seem to have much variety in the role-playing at all.  You're Geralt and just about everything about him is predefined, there's only one playstyle, there aren't many stats or skills, and choices seem to have less effect on the game compared to others.

post #5063 of 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhamnetin View Post
 

 

I agree, but in addition I don't find it's dumbed down hack and slash mechanics to be any fun.  Plus, like its predecessors it doesn't seem to have much variety in the role-playing at all.  You're Geralt and just about everything about him is predefined, there's only one playstyle, there aren't many stats or skills, and choices seem to have less effect on the game compared to others.

I suppose it depends on how you define dumbed down--for me, the epitome of dumbed down hack-and-slash combat would be the Assassin's Creed series--I'd say that Witcher 3 requires a lot more out of its players than Assassin's Creed ever did, particularly on the higher difficulty settings. Just depends on what your dumbed-down benchmark is. I know the lack of more role-playing freedom will grate on some players as well--it's nowhere near the sandbox that Elder Scrolls or Fallout games are, and its 'moral choices' and different character builds operate in subtleties rather than in the black and whites that Bioware games do. I think I'm still too early in the game to be able to decide if The Witcher 3 took the 'right' approach with its different systems, but insofar as its merits as a relatively straightforward game that rewards but does not require exploration are concerned, I think it's pretty top notch. Or would be, if it weren't such a glitch fest. It is certainly not a game for everyone, though, that much is certain. 

post #5064 of 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

I suppose it depends on how you define dumbed down--for me, the epitome of dumbed down hack-and-slash combat would be the Assassin's Creed series--I'd say that Witcher 3 requires a lot more out of its players than Assassin's Creed ever did, particularly on the higher difficulty settings. Just depends on what your dumbed-down benchmark is. I know the lack of more role-playing freedom will grate on some players as well--it's nowhere near the sandbox that Elder Scrolls or Fallout games are, and its 'moral choices' and different character builds operate in subtleties rather than in the black and whites that Bioware games do. I think I'm still too early in the game to be able to decide if The Witcher 3 took the 'right' approach with its different systems, but insofar as its merits as a relatively straightforward game that rewards but does not require exploration are concerned, I think it's pretty top notch. Or would be, if it weren't such a glitch fest. It is certainly not a game for everyone, though, that much is certain. 

 

Likewise, I haven't played enough to accurately judge its moral choice design, that was just my initial impression.  I think BioWare did a good job moving away from the more black and white choices in Dragon Age: Inquisition, in which I was able to empathize with the mages, the templars, Morrigan, and all of the candidates for the Divine.  At the same time it is, in some ways, more restrictive than something like Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer, which is very black and white at times but it allows me to play as a purely evil character or the exact opposite.  I do have to mention that despite the more black and white choices in other BioWare games, they (along with Inquisition) do provide a higher amount of more subtle changes/consequences than the first two Witcher games, though I'm speaking purely of quantity as it's still a different take on choice/consequence design altogether.


Edited by Rhamnetin - Yesterday at 5:11 pm
post #5065 of 5065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhamnetin View Post
 

 

Likewise, I haven't played enough to accurately judge its moral choice design, that was just my initial impression.  I think BioWare did a good job moving away from the more black and white choices in Dragon Age: Inquisition, in which I was able to empathize with the mages, the templars, Morrigan, and all of the candidates for the Divine.  At the same time it is, in some ways, more restrictive than something like Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer, which is very black and white at times but it allows me to play as a purely evil character or the exact opposite.  I do have to mention that despite the more black and white choices in other BioWare games, they (along with Inquisition) do provide a higher amount of more subtle changes/consequences than the first two Witcher games, though I'm speaking purely of quantity as it's still a different take on choice/consequence design altogether.

I can sure guess how you "empathized" with Morrigan, I know I did. Best part, I wanted to keep my options open so kept Leila or Leliana or whatever her name was at least partially on the hook untill she figured me out and threw it at my face (I thought of Kelso from that 70 show).

I Loved dragon age Origines so much that I played it 6 times, every time trying new conversations, combat styles, combos... I really felt like Baldurs Gate would approve :D.

 

On the Witcher thou, I never thought choices or consequences were the good thing about the game. I liked the feel of the game rather than anything in particular with it.

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