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Ten CDs to Introduce New Listeners to Classical Music - Page 3

post #31 of 40

Wow i LOVE this thread. I am that guy whose interest in classical music, I am somewhat sheepish to admit, comes from Movies.redface.gif

From the movies I absolutely love Schindler's list, Hannibal (Vide Cor Meum), and Shawshank Redemption.

 

I will definitely be exploring the suggestions made here.

 

 

A very big THANK YOU!

 

PA

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Thanks.

I have more full Rings than fingers and toes, but parts like Rhine Journey, Forest Mumurs and Wotan's Farewell excerpt fine. That particular cd is worth it for Szell's spectacular conducting. He was a powerhouse when he wanted to be.


My first LP was Szell conducting Rossini highlights ... it's incredible how underrated he is, especially since he took the Cleveland Orchestra from being virtually nothing to being one of the leading world orchestras. Barbirolli is another conductor like that whose recordings turn up at budget prices: there's a ten disc set of The Great EMI Recordings that looks as though it would be good.

 

 

 

post #33 of 40

I love to see old threads resuscitated. I just finished reading Classical Music for Dummies, yes I read it. Informative, well written and organized and a bit humorous and with an accompanying CD. I found it very helpful though overwhelming at times. Books are good, but I wish there was a Music appreciation class at the CC, I looked, none, or a knowledgeable classical music lover to sit with and chat and listen. I think this thread could be very helpful in steering me to good music and to helping me understand/appreciate classical. Thanks to you knowledgeable posters and especially bigshot for starting this thread 2 years before I joined Head-Fi.  

post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 
It's a great time to be a classical music fan. Classical CDs are dirt cheap, and there are box sets that are great. If i was writing this post today, I'd suggest the spectacular Living Stereo Box set. For two bucks a disk you get more fantastic performances than you can shake a stick at. And the selection of music makes up a pretty comprehensive intro to core romantic repetoire.

http://www.amazon.com/Living-Stereo-60-Collection-Box/dp/B003UCPEJ2/
post #35 of 40

I found this site pretty helpful:

 

http://www.classicalcdguide.com/

 

 

 

...

post #36 of 40

For an introduction, short and sweet goes a long way.

 

Bach Violin Concerto #2

Bach Violin Concerto #1

 

 

Short Concertos with the 3 movement structure tend to be less overwhelming, especially these with their super catchy first and last movements.

post #37 of 40

I agree.  I would also suggest Concerto for 2 violins, strings & continuo in D minor ("Double"), BWV 1043.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

For an introduction, short and sweet goes a long way.

 

Bach Violin Concerto #2

Bach Violin Concerto #1

 

 

Short Concertos with the 3 movement structure tend to be less overwhelming, especially these with their super catchy first and last movements.



 

post #38 of 40

This Rachmaninoff

 

 What I did to get into classical music was buy one of the all-too-common 50 best CDs on iTunes, and then I picked up full CDs of my favorite tracks at my public library.

 

Any recording of Dvorak's 9th New World Symphony is a great place to start for any americans who might like historical civil war films or americana . I know that resonated a lot with me after watching movies like Gettysburg.

 

Film scores can also be a good bridge to classical music.

post #39 of 40

Mozart - Piano Concerto 20 Uchida

Tchaikovsky - Symphony 5 Karajan/Berlin (60's)

Dvorak - Symphony 7 (Cleveland/Dohnanyi)  

Rachmaninov - Piano Concerto 3 (Ashkenazy)

Schubert - String Quintet (Lindsays or Leipzig)

Borodin - String Quartets (Borodin Qt)

Bach - Brandenburg Concerti (Pinnock on period instruments)

Beethoven - Missa Solemnis (Gardiner)

Smetana - Ma Vlast (Ancerl 1963 so if a more modern sound is required try Levine D G)

Stravinsky - The Rite Of Spring (Atlanta/Levi)

 

All of the above are starting points on the musical journey. If you listen to the late Schubert Qts it will inevitably lead you to the Beethoven's (start with 7-9) you will also reach the Tchaikovsky St Qt No 1. You have an exciting time ahead full of surprises and a few disappointments. When you find something that you like follow the trail.

However I would add that 'Greatest Hits' collections should be avoided like the plague. The composer wrote a complete work with a beginning and end and each part of the work contributes to the whole. There are plenty of Overtures and short tone poems for a quick fix (Sibelius Karelia is one such)

Anyway enough pontificating from me.

Enjoy the music and the journey. 

 

post #40 of 40

 

Hi Bigshot!

 

That's funny - I should have come here first, but I'm happy to say that after a lot of reading on my own, I decided to get the Boston Pops version of Rhapsody in Blue - just as you've suggested here.  Whew!  I would have been disappointed had I discovered you were recommending a different recording.

 

I'll have to explore these others slowly but surely.

 

Thanks!

 

Mike

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