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power strip into UPS ?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
If you have a UPS [for cpu] and you have a lot of other additional accessories [subwoofer, speakers, monitor, etc.] that you don't want to neccessarily plug into the ups, can you attach a power strip into one of the ports on the UPS & plug the devices into the power strip? Is it harmful, or bad, to do it this way?
post #2 of 17
They are still plugged into the UPS. If you don't want them to overload the UPS, get a GOOD surge suppressor and plug it into the wall.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
surge suppressor?

so does the surge suppresor plug into the wall? then the ups plugs into the surge supressor? then the powerstrip plugs into the ups?

is it advisable to plug the powerstrip into the ups?
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by Badtz
surge suppressor?

so does the surge suppresor plug into the wall? then the ups plugs into the surge supressor? then the powerstrip plugs into the ups?

is it advisable to plug the powerstrip into the ups?
I have done this in the past and there is no problem doing it with one caveat: don't overload the UPS by hooking-up your microwave, TV, Dishwasher, Washing Machine, etc... When she get's overloaded she will tell you by screaming at you and shutting everything down.

I also recommend plugging the UPS into a surge-protector as, should a nast surge occur, the power strips are much cheaper to replace than a UPS is to repair (even though there is lots of surge protection inside a UPS, and the parts are only a few cents each). Ususally when this happens people aren't going to rip it apart and replace the parts themselves.

And yet one more thing, I don't recommend using a UPS for hi-fi audio gear. Most UPSes will take the AC signal and turn it into DC to charge the batteries and will then run the AC from the batteries (of from the DC current that charges the batteries too). This isn't so bad but what happend next is. When the DC is converted back into AC it's usually done in the cheapest way possible which results in a squarish wave. Most audio gear isn't going to care for this and would rather be fed a nice, clean, perfect sinus.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
nezer: thanks for some good info.

Are there such things as one-plug surge protectors? because i would not like to have a whole strip, when I'm going to plug most everything into the UPS itself.

For audio gear [sound modules, etc. etc.], is there any type of power conditioner/ups-type devices you'd recommend?

i've seen some of the monster theater ups-like devices, but they all have video/coaxial/phone protectors too, which i don't need........ ??
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by Badtz
nezer: thanks for some good info.

Are there such things as one-plug surge protectors? because i would not like to have a whole strip, when I'm going to plug most everything into the UPS itself.

For audio gear [sound modules, etc. etc.], is there any type of power conditioner/ups-type devices you'd recommend?

i've seen some of the monster theater ups-like devices, but they all have video/coaxial/phone protectors too, which i don't need........ ??
There are some pretty serious power conditioners that make Monster look pretty flimsy. These could probably be run just fine from a UPS (as long as it was beefy enough) because they take any kind of garbage you throw into it (as long as the voltage stays within a specific range) and turn-out a very nice sinus. OF course, these things cost a bloody fortune. If you're intrested I suggest a google search on "audiophile power conditioner" and that will likly turn-up more than you'll ever want to know.

As for single-outlet protectors, I do believe they are made but probably cost the same, if not more, than a standard 6-outlet strip. You might also be able to get something similar to install in the wall outlet. I'd suggest a trip to Ratshack and/or Home Depot.
post #7 of 17
You should plug your Computer and Monitor into the UPS. Running a bunch of audio equipment from the UPS will pretty much defeat its purpose, which is to provide back-up power to the computer, allowing you to save your work and shut down safely.

Audio equipment is pretty power hungry and will drastically shorten the back-up time of a UPS. Plus, as Nezer said, the power output from a UPS probably sucks. My advice, for what it's worth and a few years experience, is to get a good surge suppressor, $50 to $100, and plug all your audio stuff into it.

Leave the computer on the UPS. If possible, plug them into separate circuits to eliminate as much interference as possible. At least try to go for separate outlets.
post #8 of 17
I would like to echo gainesco and point you to this thread for further info:

http://www.head-fi.org/forums/showth...threadid=13547

markl
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
gaineso! Thanks, i'll get a UPS specifically for the cpu & surge supressor for the audio equipment.

all of this talk of surge supressor, surge protection, ups, etc. etc. is makin' my head hurt
post #10 of 17
i don't know a lot of electricity / sine waves etc.

but i have always believed there is a huge difference in ups'

i had a trip lite ups that i had problems with it not stopping a lot of interference. i use a LOT of apc ups' and have had nothing but wonderful results.

they have tons of details on their webpage about how their systems work and graphs showing what sort of power "wave" they output.

www.apcc.com

matthew
post #11 of 17

Re: power strip into UPS ?

Quote:
Originally posted by Badtz
If you have a UPS [for cpu] and you have a lot of other additional accessories [subwoofer, speakers, monitor, etc.] that you don't want to neccessarily plug into the ups, can you attach a power strip into one of the ports on the UPS & plug the devices into the power strip? Is it harmful, or bad, to do it this way?
1) Never plug a surge suppressor into a ups, or a power strip WITH surge suppression. The waveform of the UPS on battery power can, well. Don't do it. Use a power strip without any filtration or surge suppression out of a UPS. They are cheaper, anyway.

2) Some devices, especially pure analog, may not like the output waveform of a UPS on battery power. Like an audio amp. Live the UPS for most digital devices, Like computers and accessories.

3)Don't overload a UPS. A big UPS cost mucho $$$$. Too much of a load will cause the UPS to turn off, defeating the purpose, or perhaps damaging the UPS.

I use three UPS's. One for my computer stuff. One for my modem and router, one for my TiVo (digital video recorder, basically a computer for tv).

ALL electronics in my house are on surge suppressors. My living room electronices go through a Brickwall Series Mode Surge Suppressor/filter and then regular shunt mode strips.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
what are shunt mode strips? [link?]

also

what do you mean your whole house is on surge suppressors? is there one in every outlet?

thanks for the helP!
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by Badtz
what are shunt mode strips? [link?]

also

what do you mean your whole house is on surge suppressors? is there one in every outlet?

thanks for the helP!
"Shunt mode" refers to the common solid state type of protection you see just about everywhere. The "spike" is shunted to another line or ground. Usually to ground.
Series mode (Brickwall or Zerosurge) suppressors

Everyone should check out the above link to Brickwall website. Lotsa info there on REAL surge suppression and power conditioning, not the boutique pretty expensive "power conditioners" people pay a forture for in some cases.

What I mean by "whole house" is everything in my house is protected by surge suppressors, not a big one in the house, but plugged into all outlets. Even the fridge. It's motor is a good source of spikes so I just take them out right at that outlet before getting into lines.

I only have one good Brickwall protector in my living room. If I could afford it, it would be in my bedroom system too, and my computer system.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
which surge suppressor do you use for the fridge? what benefit is that to the fridge?

thanks!
post #15 of 17
I use one of the small wall plug in ones for the fridge. It does nothing for the fridge! Any electric motor in your home creates spikes on the AC line when it starts or stops. The fridge is such a case. I use a suppressor there to "suppress" the spikes at the SOURCE, so it never contaminates my line. Wish I could do the same for the air conditioning, but I can't.

I live in a 72 unit condo. There are 72 units on one transformer outside. So I get the noise and spikes from 72 homes into my electric wiring. Makes sense to protect everything since strips can be cheap.

WalMart has some nice ones for about $30 that turn off the power to devices when protection is comprimised. Can't beat that, and its over 2k joules.

I just updated my bedroom system, so I need another Brickwall unit. They go for about $140. That's the price of one fix for my ROTEL receiver, which I like.
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