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Your 5 newest CDs (or LPs) - Page 428

post #6406 of 6419
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLACKENEDPLAGUE View Post

 

anyways I just got this today

 

 

I couldn't resist. The records are pastel pink (1) and mountain dew translucent (2)

Great purchase. The CD and LP are like night and day. I shall never in my life listen to the horrid digital release again after hearing the vinyl. I even find that the album works better when spread across four sides rather than heard continuously.

post #6407 of 6419

The pastel pink and mountain dew records are gorgeous

post #6408 of 6419


Not bad for 50¢ a piece at a local thrift shop.
post #6409 of 6419

my grandmother adores andy griffith, she cried for a few days upon learning of his death

post #6410 of 6419

Got some real goodies today.

 

Miles Davis - Bitches Brew [Mobile Fidelity numbered limited edition 2LP]

 

The most exciting one first. If there were only a handful of albums that should be found in any record collection, this landmark album would definitely be one of them. I'm not even the biggest Miles Davis fan (I recently came to the realization that he is the sole reason why I don't like the trumpet as an instrument), but this double album is certainly one of my all-time favorites. For a long time I've wanted to own it on vinyl, but I'm glad I withheld from purchasing it up until now because MoFi finally issued it on vinyl recently. Also, how can you not love that artwork?

 

Miles Davis - 'Round About Midnight [Mobile Fidelity numbered limited edition mono LP]

 

This was the second Davis album I ever heard and it remains one of my favorites of his. It is also his debut on Columbia as band leader. I wish the jacket was thicker for MoFi has some of the thickest jackets out there, but I guess they wanted to stay true to the original LP and opted for a non-gatefold.

 

Andrew Hill - Judgment! [Music Matters limited edition 45rpm 2LP]

 

Look up this album if you haven't heard it. I guarantee it'll be worth your time. :)

 

Joe Henderson - In 'n Out [Music Matters limited edition 45rpm 2LP]

 

Joe Henderson has always been one of my favorite saxophonists. 'Nuff said.

 

Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil [Music Matters limited edition 45rpm 2LP]

 

One of those absolute essential jazz albums alongside two other Shorter records, JuJu and Adam's Apple. Fun fact: I just now noticed all three Music Matters LPs I got feature Elvin Jones on drums.

 

Priscilla Ahn - A Good Day [Mobile Fidelity numbered limited edition LP]

 

I think the notes on MoFi's site are the best way to describe this LP.

 

Mastered from the original master tapes by Mobile Fidelity, A Good Day sounds positively exquisite on 180g LP, the very first time this sure-to-be audiophile vocal favorite has been made available on vinyl. While Mobile Fidelity typically issues albums that are at least a decade old, the label's engineers and decision makers felt too strongly about Ahn's 2008 album to squander any opportunity to release it. Such is the capacious amount of low-level detail, acoustic information, timbral presence, natural dynamics, and wide-spectrum frequency response present on a vocal-dominant effort that sparkles sonically as well as musically. A Good Day is the kind of airy album meant for high-end turntables, analog-friendly amplifiers, a cozy seat, and glass of fine Bordeaux.

 

Fans of Joni Mitchell, Carole King, and Laura Nyro should immediately be drawn to Ahn's personal, intimate vibes. The upstart multi-instrumentalist not only plays guitar but also masters autoharp, piano, ukulele, Wurlitzer organ, bells, and glockenspiel on tracks rife with texture and color. Yet the main attraction remains Ahn's wispy, clear, dream-like voice. Soft and sensual, spirited and soothing, her coos, whispers, and wordless flights take off like a breeze on a clear summer day, gently blowing against fields of golden flowers and pillowy clouds.

 

The vinyl contains three LP-only tracks.

 

CircusP - FIVE

https://circus-p.bandcamp.com/album/five

 

Lastly one Bandcamp purchase. CircusP had a 50% off sale on Bandcamp to celebrate his birthday, so I decided to pick up this EP for the modest price of $2.5.

 

 

post #6411 of 6419

Tuukka, you made some awesome purchases there. I didn't know MoFi released Bitches Brew on LP. Seeing their website it seems they also released Bob Dylan's Highway 61 Revisited. It seems like I got some ordering to do now. :)

 

I actually am going to pop in a listen of my MoFi Round 'Bout Midnight LP right after this. I think that album is probably my most favorite next to Kind of Blue. I have to comment on your remark for Miles Davis. I find that really interesting for you to say that he ruined the trumpet for you. Can I ask why? LOL.

 

I also must comment on Priscilla Ahn and that magnificent album. It was one of the records I purchased on impulse and from not hearing much of her work at all. So it was thanks to that LP did I discover her and her beautiful music.


Edited by Destroysall - 7/17/14 at 5:30pm
post #6412 of 6419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post
 

Tuukka, you made some awesome purchases there. I didn't know MoFi released Bitches Brew on LP. Seeing their website it seems they also released Bob Dylan's Highway 61 Revisited. It seems like I got some ordering to do now. :)

 

I actually am going to pop in a listen of my MoFi Round 'Bout Midnight LP right after this. I think that album is probably my most favorite next to Kind of Blue. I have to comment on your remark for Miles Davis. I find that really interesting for you to say that he ruined the trumpet for you. Can I ask why? LOL.

 

I also must comment on Priscilla Ahn and that magnificent album. It was one of the records I purchased on impulse and from not hearing much of her work at all. So it was thanks to that LP did I discover her and her beautiful music.

He didn't really ruin the trumpet for me forever, but Kind of Blue was the second jazz album I ever heard and Davis the first trumpet player I ever heard and for quite a while even after I actually started slowly getting into jazz my jazz collection consisted mostly of just Miles and Trane, so for the first few years Miles was certainly the most prominent trumpet player in my jazz experience. It depends on the record how he plays, but for me a big part of his signature sound is this very "piercing" way of playing the trumpet. This does not apply to mellow records like Kind of Blue for example, but one of my favorite Miles records Cookin' is a good example. It takes a genuinely high-class sound system capable of reproducing the highs extremely smoothly for me to be able to listen to that record without difficulty. The all-tube mastering on the Analogue Productions SACD I have also helps out a lot in taming Miles' trumpet. Most audio reproduction systems including low- and mid-tier hifi systems typically have notable issues in the treble range, with spikes in the response and an unpleasant metallic/ringing quality to the sound.

 

I respect Miles as an artists, being under the impression that he was a demanding band leader with an eye for young talent who typically had a clear vision of what he wanted but wasn't necessarily the most sociable person, but his personal style of playing has never really appealed to me. I like a few of his solos here and there (the one on "Right Off" on A Tribute to Jack Johnson for example is great), but generally don't listen to his records for his playing. Well it's not like he very often takes the limelight on his records anyway, often joining the music only for certain sections. During the last two years or so I've grown out of my general dislike for the trumpet, ingrained in my brain by my initial experiences with it through Miles, and I've began to see it as a surprisingly versatile instrument that can in the right hands sound very good. Freddie Hubbard for example has always been one of my favorite trumpet players and his playing is a lot of the time truly magical.

 

Edit: To clarify a little, for a couple year I thought the way Miles plays the trumpet is the only way it can sound.


Edited by TJ Elite - 7/17/14 at 2:31pm
post #6413 of 6419
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

He didn't really ruin the trumpet for me forever, but Kind of Blue was the second jazz album I ever heard and Davis the first trumpet player I ever heard and for quite a while even after I actually started slowly getting into jazz my jazz collection consisted mostly of just Miles and Trane, so for the first few years Miles was certainly the most prominent trumpet player in my jazz experience. It depends on the record how he plays, but for me a big part of his signature sound is this very "piercing" way of playing the trumpet. This does not apply to mellow records like Kind of Blue for example, but one of my favorite Miles records Cookin' is a good example. It takes a genuinely high-class sound system capable of reproducing the highs extremely smoothly for me to be able to listen to that record without difficulty. The all-tube mastering on the Analogue Productions SACD I have also helps out a lot in taming Miles' trumpet. Most audio reproduction systems including low- and mid-tier hifi systems typically have notable issues in the treble range, with spikes in the response and an unpleasant metallic/ringing quality to the sound.

 

I respect Miles as an artists, being under the impression that he was a demanding band leader with an eye for young talent who typically had a clear vision of what he wanted but wasn't necessarily the most sociable person, but his personal style of playing has never really appealed to me. I like a few of his solos here and there (the one on "Right Off" on A Tribute to Jack Johnson for example is great), but generally don't listen to his records for his playing. Well it's not like he very often takes the limelight on his records anyway, often joining the music only for certain sections. During the last two years or so I've grown out of my general dislike for the trumpet, ingrained in my brain by my initial experiences with it through Miles, and I've began to see it as a surprisingly versatile instrument that can in the right hands sound very good. Freddie Hubbard for example has always been one of my favorite trumpet players and his playing is a lot of the time truly magical.

 

Edit: To clarify a little, for a couple year I thought the way Miles plays the trumpet is the only way it can sound.


I have to admit, you make some very strong key points. I can understand why it is that a player can be considered over-bearing to listen to at times. I do feel the same way at times actually. Miles was an exceptional artist and one of the most influential people in the world of Jazz. Studying his work in college, I learned he always pushed the boundaries and even developed new sub-genres within the Jazz primary genre. I do believe his lack of being sociable possibly derived from his adamant of not performing and sometimes even discussing his past work. He was always focused on the present. 

 

I find most of his more mellow records to be the ones I revisit the most. I think what I concur with, and probably one of the reasons I don't listen to a lot of his more vibrant albums, is simply the fact that he can be a very ear-piercing player. I love the trumpet personally, and being a trombone player having worked with trumpet players, I know the difficulty and the amount of articulation and precision that goes into playing the instrument. Perhaps that plays into my fascination of the instrument. Yet the sonic quality it produces when pushed (specifically without a mute) can be really undesirable and sibilant. He's an easy player to recognize and some of the work he's produced has been marvelous. I wouldn't have discovered the world of Jazz without his music and without Kind of Blue.

 

I do have to say, I think I lean more on your side of the boat in that I enjoy hearing players like Freddie Hubbard and even Kenny Dorham a bit more.

post #6414 of 6419

The Beatles: Help TOJP-60185 180grm Ltd Ed LP Japan

The Beatles: A Hard Day's Night TOJP-60183 180grm Ltd Ed LP Japan

The Beatles: One 7243-5-29325-1-1 180grm LP EU

Chie Ayado: Live BSR-3007-1 180grm Ltd Ed S/N 0980 USA

Arthur Fiedler & the Boston Pops: play Beatles' Greatest Hits CDS-1143 LP UK

Harry Secombe: This is My Song 6308-158 Phonogram LP New Zealand

post #6415 of 6419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post


I have to admit, you make some very strong key points. I can understand why it is that a player can be considered over-bearing to listen to at times. I do feel the same way at times actually. Miles was an exceptional artist and one of the most influential people in the world of Jazz. Studying his work in college, I learned he always pushed the boundaries and even developed new sub-genres within the Jazz primary genre. I do believe his lack of being sociable possibly derived from his adamant of not performing and sometimes even discussing his past work. He was always focused on the present. 

 

I find most of his more mellow records to be the ones I revisit the most. I think what I concur with, and probably one of the reasons I don't listen to a lot of his more vibrant albums, is simply the fact that he can be a very ear-piercing player. I love the trumpet personally, and being a trombone player having worked with trumpet players, I know the difficulty and the amount of articulation and precision that goes into playing the instrument. Perhaps that plays into my fascination of the instrument. Yet the sonic quality it produces when pushed (specifically without a mute) can be really undesirable and sibilant. He's an easy player to recognize and some of the work he's produced has been marvelous. I wouldn't have discovered the world of Jazz without his music and without Kind of Blue.

 

I do have to say, I think I lean more on your side of the boat in that I enjoy hearing players like Freddie Hubbard and even Kenny Dorham a bit more.

Miles was indeed in the vanguard of jazz from the late-40s all the way to the 70s, moving from the birth of cool jazz to hard bop, then to modal jazz, followed by some ventures into third stream before exploring post-bop and finally moving on to jazz fusion and ultimately transitioning to jazz-funk before withdrawing mostly from music. It is his talent as a bandleader and a composer that I listen to his records for and not really his trumpet playing, although I can see why many enjoy his style and when Miles is playing very atmospherically I think he's at his best for me. He is very much like Charles Mingus in that regard, for he was an exceptional composer and bandleader but even though he was certainly a skilled bassist, I don't think his bass playing is what makes those records what they are. Thelonious Monk, however, whose work I adore, was not only one of the greatest composers in jazz in my opinion, but a truly unique piano player to boot.

 

In a documentary about Miles that I once saw, one of Miles' wives was asked what kind of music her husband listened to at home and her reply was interesting for she said that Miles first of all never really listened to any of his own music and hardly even jazz. He mainly listened to classical music, Stravinsky being the only name I can recall of the ones she mentioned. I always thought that was very interesting. I think Miles was a very smart man, but he was difficult to get along with, which might speak for why he married so many times although I've heard he suffered both from a drug and a sex addiction which certainly didn't help things in the least. What you said about him refusing to play any of his old work is something I've heard as well and a thing I can respect. I don't think an artists should give the people what they think they want but what they don't know they need. If we just keep repeating ourselves over and over and looking back, we'll never get anywhere. Life shouldn't be about standing still but moving forward.

 

On an unrelated note, I received a newsletter from Kayo Dot last night mostly concerning the delay in shipment of their Hubardo LPs, but they also wholeheartedly recommended a live performance of theirs they recently put up on Bandcamp. I checked it out and based on the first five minutes alone it certainly seems very interesting. I though it might definitely be up your alley so here's a link to it: https://kayodot.bandcamp.com/album/coyote-live-on-wmbr-august-31-2010

 

Also, it does feature trumpets. ;)

post #6416 of 6419
My local record store is moving soon so they are having a 30% off sale on everything! Here are some of the LPs I picked up. Also, sorry for the picture quality, I took these quickly with an ipad.


Atmosphere is one of my favorite rap artists and their new album doesn't disappoint. The record is a cool metallic silver color too.


The is the new 2014 remaster. I think it sounds great. It's also very quiet. Of course I don't have an older copy to compare to but it sounds good enough to me. Led Zeppelin II is my favorite out of their first three albums.


This is one of my favorite jazz albums. I feel this album doesn't get enough love. This is one of those albums I could put on at any time and still enjoy it immensely.


This is probably my second favorite Stones album behind Exile on Mainstreet (of course). This is the "clearly classics" reissue and while I know colored vinyl and the sorts are known to not sound as good as regular black vinyl, this pressing sounds fantastic! No compression like on the newer digital versions i heard. Plus it looks super cool while spinning it! biggrin.gif


I found this one new for $10 plus 30% off. I couldn't say no. While I'd put "Whats Going On" and "Lets Get It On" above "I Want You", I still think this is a good album with very lush instrumentation.
post #6417 of 6419
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ Elite View Post
 

Miles was indeed in the vanguard of jazz from the late-40s all the way to the 70s, moving from the birth of cool jazz to hard bop, then to modal jazz, followed by some ventures into third stream before exploring post-bop and finally moving on to jazz fusion and ultimately transitioning to jazz-funk before withdrawing mostly from music. It is his talent as a bandleader and a composer that I listen to his records for and not really his trumpet playing, although I can see why many enjoy his style and when Miles is playing very atmospherically I think he's at his best for me. He is very much like Charles Mingus in that regard, for he was an exceptional composer and bandleader but even though he was certainly a skilled bassist, I don't think his bass playing is what makes those records what they are. Thelonious Monk, however, whose work I adore, was not only one of the greatest composers in jazz in my opinion, but a truly unique piano player to boot.

 

In a documentary about Miles that I once saw, one of Miles' wives was asked what kind of music her husband listened to at home and her reply was interesting for she said that Miles first of all never really listened to any of his own music and hardly even jazz. He mainly listened to classical music, Stravinsky being the only name I can recall of the ones she mentioned. I always thought that was very interesting. I think Miles was a very smart man, but he was difficult to get along with, which might speak for why he married so many times although I've heard he suffered both from a drug and a sex addiction which certainly didn't help things in the least. What you said about him refusing to play any of his old work is something I've heard as well and a thing I can respect. I don't think an artists should give the people what they think they want but what they don't know they need. If we just keep repeating ourselves over and over and looking back, we'll never get anywhere. Life shouldn't be about standing still but moving forward.

 

On an unrelated note, I received a newsletter from Kayo Dot last night mostly concerning the delay in shipment of their Hubardo LPs, but they also wholeheartedly recommended a live performance of theirs they recently put up on Bandcamp. I checked it out and based on the first five minutes alone it certainly seems very interesting. I though it might definitely be up your alley so here's a link to it: https://kayodot.bandcamp.com/album/coyote-live-on-wmbr-august-31-2010

 

Also, it does feature trumpets. ;)


Now that is definitely interesting. I had no idea he primarily listened to classical music on his own time. Especially Stravinsky; I can see where his inspiration to push limits came about now. May I quote you for saying "I don't think artists should give the people what they think they want but what they don't know they need." Bravo! As an artist myself, I must applaud this statement for its gravitas and truth. I think this philosophy alone is what makes life, let-alone art, interesting.

 

I am liking this. I love Kayo Dot's previous work, and the contemporary classical influences in this live performance (and the performance itself) is haunting and idyllic. Definitely adding this to my wishlist! The trumpets in this are quite nice, btw. ;)

post #6418 of 6419

Pink Floyd :  Discovery box set (14 albums)

Daft Punk : Random access memories

Led Zeppelin : Hard Zepp

post #6419 of 6419

Yanni - If I Could Tell You

Yanni - Out of Silence

Roger Daltrey - Rocks In The Head
Phil Collins - Both Sides
Phil Collins - Going Back

Love Yanni very much!

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