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how many of you guys cook??? - Page 182

post #2716 of 2857
Yes, but what was the wine?
post #2717 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by PalJoey View Post

Yes, but what was the wine?

 

Shatter, Grenache 2010

post #2718 of 2857
Clayton, you have a very sophisticated palates. When are we going to hangout again? I may be SF bound in August.
post #2719 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc9394 View Post

Clayton, you have a very sophisticated palates. When are we going to hangout again? I may be SF bound in August.

 

Thanks. I'll be in SF a part of August, the other part I may be in Europe. I have to see how my funds hold out by then. ;)

post #2720 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc9394 View Post
 

try the cooler method, it is pretty good.

 

http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/04/cook-your-meat-in-a-beer-cooler-the-worlds-best-sous-vide-hack.html

At some friends' house last night, and they cooked this Ottolenghi recipe for beetroot and celeriac gratin: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/nov/16/beetroot-gratin-recipe-tunisian-eggs Incredibly tasty, rich and satisfying. Definitely worth trying, even for non-veggies like me!

 

But tonight, I bit the bullet and cooked sous-vide salmon in a beer cooler. We’ve just finished eating, and it went really well. The salmon, while being completely cooked was unbelievably tender and the ingredients I’d put in the bag with it (salt, parsley, lemon zest and some hazelnut butter) has permeated the fish without overpowering it. The beer cooler, with a small top-up from the kettle after 20 minutes, lost about 15 degrees heat over 50-odd minutes.

post #2721 of 2857

Pulled pork, bacon, egg, cheese and roasted bread :p

This is like the only thing I can do.. xD

post #2722 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by PalJoey View Post

At some friends' house last night, and they cooked this Ottolenghi recipe for beetroot and celeriac gratin: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/nov/16/beetroot-gratin-recipe-tunisian-eggs Incredibly tasty, rich and satisfying. Definitely worth trying, even for non-veggies like me!

But tonight, I bit the bullet and cooked sous-vide salmon in a beer cooler. We’ve just finished eating, and it went really well. The salmon, while being completely cooked was unbelievably tender and the ingredients I’d put in the bag with it (salt, parsley, lemon zest and some hazelnut butter) has permeated the fish without overpowering it. The beer cooler, with a small top-up from the kettle after 20 minutes, lost about 15 degrees heat over 50-odd minutes.

I have the beer cooler that holds the temp for 4 hours only lost about 5 degrees. Once put it in, don't open it until it is done. If you are meat lover, try double cut pork chop cooked to 145 degrees. It is extreme tender and juicy. I cooked it for 3 hours to break down the fibers.
Edited by jc9394 - 4/26/14 at 2:58pm
post #2723 of 2857

I had the use of one of these IR thermometers - http://www.amazon.co.uk/GM300-Non-contact-Infrared-Digital-Thermometer/dp/B007NVYWUS/ref=pd_cp_diy_1 - which allowed me to get an instant reading and top up from the kettle when necessary, so the lid was only off for a few seconds.

 

I'd assume that, with red meat (or the pork chops) you could finish it on the grill or frying pan to get some tasty caramelisation on the outside. Or would that be better done before bagging the meat up for the beer cooler?

post #2724 of 2857

I just found this chart, which should be a help for those wishing to try sous-vide (beer cooler or otherwise). It's a lot more legible if you open the image in a separate window. It is from this useful website - http://www.sousvidesupreme.com/en-uk/sousvide_cookingtemperatures.htm.



 





 

post #2725 of 2857

Some of the best steaks I've made at home have been with beer cooler sous vide for about an hour with 130°F initial water and keeping it at around 125°F with some additional water 30 minutes in.  Take it out after that time, pat it dry and sear both side with a blazing hot cast iron pan for about a minute, and you get a nice crust with a thorough medium rare from edge to edge.  

post #2726 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by daigo View Post


 

Some of the best steaks I've made at home have been with beer cooler sous vide for about an hour with 130°F initial water and keeping it at around 125°F with some additional water 30 minutes in.  Take it out after that time, pat it dry and sear both side with a blazing hot cast iron pan for about a minute, and you get a nice crust with a thorough medium rare from edge to edge.


I only have an electric hob, which won't get hot enough to create a decent crust that fast, sadly. But it does sound damn tasty!


 

Given the result I got from the salmon, I'm thinking of investing in a decent beer cooler and IR thermometer, then having a crack at sous-viding some game, like hare or pigeon. And I saw moose steaks in Lidl last time I was in a branch...

post #2727 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by PalJoey View Post
 


I only have an electric hob, which won't get hot enough to create a decent crust that fast, sadly. But it does sound damn tasty!


 

Given the result I got from the salmon, I'm thinking of investing in a decent beer cooler and IR thermometer, then having a crack at sous-viding some game, like hare or pigeon. And I saw moose steaks in Lidl last time I was in a branch...

 

Ah, electric stoves are bad news :(  I have a decent gas range from Electrolux, not super high heat of a full on professional burner or one with an air line, but it can get my pans pretty hot.  If I were to invest in sous vide, there are small options like this one ( http://anovaculinary.com/ ) for around $200 USD that can handle a few small pieces of protein without issues.  I've been thinking about getting one.  

post #2728 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by daigo View Post
 

 

Ah, electric stoves are bad news :(  I have a decent gas range from Electrolux, not super high heat of a full on professional burner or one with an air line, but it can get my pans pretty hot.  If I were to invest in sous vide, there are small options like this one ( http://anovaculinary.com/ ) for around $200 USD that can handle a few small pieces of protein without issues.  I've been thinking about getting one.  

 

That is the one I got, I cooked two rack of lambs, two veal chops, and few hanger steaks in a large stock pot.  No issue at all.

post #2729 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by daigo View Post
 

 

Ah, electric stoves are bad news :(  

 

Not all of them - ours over here burn as hot as the run of the mill gas burners, without the safety hazards (we don't have them piped in, just propane tank deliveries, but even then I've seen places in the US blow up because of the piped-in gas). My cast iron pan with the electric stove at full tilt will smoke the seasoning and have it glow slightly red, whereas last night I was a friend's house and their gas stove only managed to smoke the seasoning. I laid down the steak before I end up needing to season it again as it was already five minutes since it began to smoke but it wasn't glowing reddish yet. Still got a decent crust on the steaks though, but that's more because I made sure to dry them out on paper bags for 40mins (bought them fresh just a half hour before that) while we waited for pizza. Even the fat on the rib eyes got crunchy enough on the edges. They were all amazed at how I did that when their stoneware pans and heavy griddles couldn't do that on the same stove.

 

If anything, an electric stove takes a hell lot of time to get to the right temp. My stove at home takes about ten minutes from cold with the knob at full tilt before the oil starts smoking, but in a couple of minutes or so the pan would begin to glow reddish in the center.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 5/1/14 at 8:05pm
post #2730 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 


 

Not all of them - ours over here burn as hot as the run of the mill gas burners, without the safety hazards (we don't have them piped in, just propane tank deliveries, but even then I've seen places in the US blow up because of the piped-in gas). My cast iron pan with the electric stove at full tilt will smoke the seasoning and have it glow slightly red, whereas last night I was a friend's house and their gas stove only managed to smoke the seasoning. I laid down the steak before I end up needing to season it again as it was already five minutes since it began to smoke but it wasn't glowing reddish yet. Still got a decent crust on the steaks though, but that's more because I made sure to dry them out on paper bags for 40mins (bought them fresh just a half hour before that) while we waited for pizza. Even the fat on the rib eyes got crunchy enough on the edges. They were all amazed at how I did that when their stoneware pans and heavy griddles couldn't do that on the same stove.


 

If anything, an electric stove takes a hell lot of time to get to the right temp. My stove at home takes about ten minutes from cold with the knob at full tilt before the oil starts smoking, but in a couple of minutes or so the pan would begin to glow reddish in the center.


When I have the time, I unwrap the steaks and leave them on a rack over a plate in the fridge overnight. Dries them out very nicely.

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