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how many of you guys cook??? - Page 180

post #2686 of 2857

last year i bought my first smoker.  it's a small vertical water/charcoal smoker.  its fun and produces really awesome bbq.  other than bbq, i do about 85% of the cooking as well.  i enjoy it. 

 

 

 

chicken adobo

 

 

 

seared ribeye directly on charcoal chimney

 

 

 

 

20lbs of pork butt

 

 

 

 

Pork Fatty

 

 

 

 

Smoker

 

 

 

Another pork butt

 

 

 

post #2687 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc9394 View Post

^^^ slow roast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eee Pee View Post

Show it a flame and throw it on my plate.




with a great smoked taste!
post #2688 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by luberconn View Post

last year i bought my first smoker.  it's a small vertical water/charcoal smoker.  its fun and produces really awesome bbq.  other than bbq, i do about 85% of the cooking as well.  i enjoy it. 

 

seared ribeye directly on charcoal chimney

 

I also sear with the steak underneath the chimney, using HW charcoal (mitigates ash dust).  The top-down method theoretically prevents flare ups, given that the fats aren't above the fire.  That's why many steakhouses like Peter Lugar "broil" with 1000F degree flames above the steak, vs. cook over a grill.

 

Practically, however, I've found that the above / below chimney sear happens so fast that flare ups aren't really an issue.  Once I sear, I set up an indirect flame, chuck the steak on the side, and sometimes put hickory or mesquite chips on the fire for added smoke flavor. 

 

 

Pork Fatty

 

A Thing of Beauty is a Joy forever.

post #2689 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadie View Post
 

my thoughts exactly... in the presance of such a epic peice of meat... I too can't think of anything worthy to say! 

post #2690 of 2857

thanks fellas!  i've experimented with both searing steaks above and below on the chimney.  i've found that cooking them above you get much higher temps than below.  like you mentioned, there is some flare up, but not a ton since the cook time is only a minute or two per side.   either way, you are going to produce a better "crust" on your meat than conventional grilling.  

 

with the pork fatties, you can get real creative.  i've done them with peppers & goat cheese, jalepeno n cream cheese, mac n cheese and hot dogs (for kids), pizza type toppings.....the possibilities are endless.  

post #2691 of 2857

A couple days ago I made a s'mores cake... graham crumb/butter/banana crust, poured chocolate cake on top, home made marshmallow layer on top of that, then topped it off with some regular square graham crackers. I forgot to take pictures unfortunately.

post #2692 of 2857

A salad of green beans and Roma tomatoes in olive oil and vinegar.

post #2693 of 2857
I can cook 69 burgers at once at the bar I work at. Just kidding. My record is 17.
post #2694 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwelveTrains View Post

I can cook 69 burgers at once at the bar I work at. Just kidding. My record is 17.

 

You can probably try to cook 69 burgers at once, but you'll just make them all well done and inedible!

post #2695 of 2857

 

Not having a garden or yard, I do envy those who have the requisite open space to smoke and generally barbecue.

 

I can do ribs indoors (dry rub, several hours in the slow cooker, then slather on the sauce and finish in regular hot oven 'til sticky), but there's no substitute for real smoke.

post #2696 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton SF View Post
 

A salad of green beans and Roma tomatoes in olive oil and vinegar.

 

Those would go well with grilled pork or yellowfin belly (or yellow fin jaw), especially with some kind of slightly sweet marinade (on the pork) or glaze (on the fish), then knock it back with some full-bodied pilsner.

post #2697 of 2857

In fact, I do a lot of my cooking with a Remoska - http://www.remoska.co.uk/ - it's very simple, easy to clean, but cooks quite a wide variety of dishes, as long as you're not into micromanaging your recipes. For more complexity and control, I fire up the regular oven.

 

The Remoska is basically a lightweight, nonstick deep pan with legs to keep the heat from the kitchen surface, while the lid contains the electric elements, so it applies heat from above. 

post #2698 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by PalJoey View Post

Not having a garden or yard, I do envy those who have the requisite open space to smoke and generally barbecue.

I can do ribs indoors (dry rub, several hours in the slow cooker, then slather on the sauce and finish in regular hot oven 'til sticky), but there's no substitute for real smoke.

 

For an indoor ribs hack, what about tossing some wood chips or sawdust into a roasting pan, over the stove (low flame), then above that a cooling rack with the ribs?  All that covered with foil, then placed under the hood vent / fan, in a well ventilated open window house.  Then again, this may not work in winter, but give it a month.  ;)

 

After about an hour of that, wrap it up in foil with some apple juice and bbq sauce, and stick it in a low 250F oven for another 4 hours.  Uncover, apply more bbq sauce, broil for char, and nom nom nom. 

 

With St. Paddy's Day coming up in a couple of weeks, the corned beef is coming out of the woodwork at supermarkets, whole foods, trader joes, etc.  I just chuck the whole thing in the le crueset, cover with beer or water, put in oven, let braise for 3 hours @ 350F, then let rest at 180F indefinitely until serving time.  Boil copious amounts of potatoes, carrots, and cabbage, serve with a yummy stout like Iron Fist's Velvet Glove, and thar's a meal.  More importantly, you've now got the leftovers basis for bad-ass breakfast hash.

post #2699 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by daigo View Post
 

 

You can probably try to cook 69 burgers at once, but you'll just make them all well done and inedible!

This is very true.

post #2700 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadie View Post
 

 

For an indoor ribs hack, what about tossing some wood chips or sawdust into a roasting pan, over the stove (low flame), then above that a cooling rack with the ribs?  All that covered with foil, then placed under the hood vent / fan, in a well ventilated open window house.  Then again, this may not work in winter, but give it a month.  ;)

I did tea-smoked salmon a while back. Turns out my flat isn't particularly well ventilated, as the smell took a LONG time to dissipate. 

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