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how many of you guys cook??? - Page 179

post #2671 of 2857

Agree'd I like my steaks from a Cast Iron pan best my self, cooked with a little olive oil salt + pepper.

 

Not a big Grill guy, but that's cuz I never use a grill or live where I can even have one tbh. Still I LOVE a nice well Rubbed Chuck Roast! My old land lord cooked one HECK of a roast [in the oven] that dude could cook a Freaking STEAK, and most of what we ate was teh cheap Choice stuff... even then he cooked it PERFECT and it was always good 

post #2672 of 2857
I'm one of those ugly Americans that believes that beef needs to be grain fed. You can bet the beef at Harris Ranch is (I have been there several times). Restaurants that crow about their "grass-fed" beef just don't get it. IMHO there is a HUGE difference, and I will take grain-fed US beef over grass-fed South American or Australian beef every single time.
post #2673 of 2857

Got some Hawaiian Chili Peppers from my friend on Oahu.

What to do?

 

Make CPW (Chili Pepper Water).

 

Then I used some CPW to spice up my Chawanmushi!

post #2674 of 2857

I lurve me some beef tartar with a fresh raw quail egg as well as carpaccio with capers, arugula, and a tiny splash of vinegar and parmesan, so I approach "steak" from the other direction: as raw as possible.

 

If I'm going through the trouble and massive expense to source ultra-premium, ultra-marbled wagyu or at minimum USDA Prime beef, it's going to get a quick and brutal sear and that's it.  When you buy uber-beef, let's be honest, what you're (mostly) paying for is the fat, and a lot of it.  I also expect tasty protein and infinitesimal gristle.

 

If you're paying top dollar for super marbled steak, and you cook it past rare, all you're doing is rendering out the very reason for acquiring said steak.  I want my beef seared quick to generate additional Maillard flavor that complements the inherent / core flavor of the beef and fat.  Beyond that, all I need is a bit of salt and maybe some fresh ground pepper, and I'm golden.

 

That said, that level / quality / expense is a once-a-year indulgence.

 

Give me a nicely marbled bone-in rib eye, I'll salt and sear that puppy till rare, then make all manner of sauces.

 

Dead simple - make "ponzu" dipping sauce with fresh squeezed lemon juice and soy sauce.  Seriously, try it.

 

Otherwise, get some minced shallots in a pan with butter, flambe with whiskey, and finish with heavy cream, S&P.   Unf.  Coronary on a plate, but what a way to go.


Edited by deadie - 2/24/14 at 8:22pm
post #2675 of 2857

Oh yeah!  Make some chili pepper vinegar as well, with some whole garlic cloves and whole peppercorns.  Universal condiment.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clayton SF View Post
 

Got some Hawaiian Chili Peppers from my friend on Oahu.

What to do?

 

 

post #2676 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadie View Post

Oh yeah!  Make some chili pepper vinegar as well, with some whole garlic cloves and whole peppercorns.  Universal condiment.

Oh. That what that is. We're on the same page with this condiment:

 

In the photo we have 1/4 cup white vinegar, 1/4 cup cider vinegar, 1/2 cup water and 2 cloves of chopped garlic and 9 whole peppercorns as well. Some peppercorns are seen floating at the top, some on the bottom, mingling with the chopped garlic.

 

post #2677 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadie View Post

Oh yeah!  Make some chili pepper vinegar as well, with some whole garlic cloves and whole peppercorns.  Universal condiment.

 

I use that as sauce for our garlic sausages and beakfast steak - basically thin slices of skirt steak marinated overnight in soy sauce/Worcestershire, garlic, and sugar, then seared on the pan. Sometimes I saute onions in butter, some of that in (but used cane vinegar), then serve it warm as a dipping sauce for deep-fried pig forelegs (preferably the front).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by deadie View Post

 

If I'm going through the trouble and massive expense to source ultra-premium, ultra-marbled wagyu or at minimum USDA Prime beef, it's going to get a quick and brutal sear and that's it.  When you buy uber-beef, let's be honest, what you're (mostly) paying for is the fat, and a lot of it.  I also expect tasty protein and infinitesimal gristle.

 

Actually, cheap beef needs to be cooked rare too - otherwise they'll get chewy. My friends have learned to appreciate eating steak that way, and even my brother after I seared his striploin steak on a griddle; those who resist met with this argument:

"Do you eat seared maguro, sushi, or sashimi?"
"Yes..."
"How do you know the tuna didn't swim through huge whale diarrhea and that stuff went through its gills and mouth? I'm quite sure the cow didn't dive into a cesspool, by the way, so please think about your raw fish."

So far everyone started eating their steaks rare rather than stop eating Japanese food, and I've gotten away serving relatively cheap, $5/lb ribeye.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 2/25/14 at 12:54am
post #2678 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadie View Post
 

 

If I'm going through the trouble and massive expense to source ultra-premium, ultra-marbled wagyu or at minimum USDA Prime beef, it's going to get a quick and brutal sear and that's it.  When you buy uber-beef, let's be honest, what you're (mostly) paying for is the fat, and a lot of it.  I also expect tasty protein and infinitesimal gristle.

 

 

 

Try cook wagyu with top grade soy source mixed with top grade sake.  Just a dip into the boiling liquid.   Super yummy.  When I was in Japan, my colleague said Kagoshima Kuroushi is better than Kobe/Wagyu.

post #2679 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc9394 View Post

 

Try cook wagyu with top grade soy source mixed with top grade sake.  Just a dip into the boiling liquid.   Super yummy.  When I was in Japan, my colleague said Kagoshima Kuroushi is better than Kobe/Wagyu.

 

That brings up a fantastic memory, one of my top 5 meals.

 

~15 years ago I traveled to Japan on business, and to celebrate a client win our local GM took us out for Shabu Shabu.  For the life of me I can't remember the name of the restaurant or even the precise building in Shinjuku.  As with many restaurants across Asia, it was located on the top floor of some business tower, and all we had to eat was copious amounts of killer beef and sake.

 

I remember being just so blown away by the quality and tastiness of the beef.  The slices were very light pink, owing to the high fat content.  And yep, we just dipped into a flavorful broth and gorged.  If memory serves, it was a $400 / person meal, but what price utter bliss.  

 

Tangentially, I don't know if it's "progress" per se that that price is somewhat normal nowadays, given pre fixe / paired meals that run 10+ courses, over the course of 3 hours.  Even worse, IMO, is if you leave the meal still hungry b/c it was composed primarily of "molecular gastronomy" tricks such as asparagus foam piped over abalone gelle, served under a cloudy cup of mushroom smoke.  90% spectacle, 10% edible.

post #2680 of 2857

FYI to "Siracha" fans.  I picked up this SkyValley sauce recently and was pleased that it deviated away from "normal" Siracha flavor, and instead is essentially a thinner Gochujang.  It ain't gonna impress your Korean grandma, but nonetheless, it still has that distinctive sweet smooth fermented gochujang flavor.

 

Everyone knows about Huy Fong Siracha, and while that's been a longstanding staple in my fridge and in my pho, the Sky Valley is now my go-to for fries, burgers, mayo, cookies, you name it.

 

post #2681 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadie View Post
 

FYI to "Siracha" fans.  I picked up this SkyValley sauce recently and was pleased that it deviated away from "normal" Siracha flavor, and instead is essentially a thinner Gochujang.  It ain't gonna impress your Korean grandma, but nonetheless, it still has that distinctive sweet smooth fermented gochujang flavor.

 

Everyone knows about Huy Fong Siracha, and while that's been a longstanding staple in my fridge and in my pho, the Sky Valley is now my go-to for fries, burgers, mayo, cookies, you name it.

 

Reading about your Sky Valley Sriracha sauce made me hunt for it and in the hunt I found this interesting article. Thanks. :)

The Sriracha Cha-Cha

 

post #2682 of 2857


1,4 kg pure bliss....
post #2683 of 2857
^^^ slow roast?
post #2684 of 2857

Show it a flame and throw it on my plate.

post #2685 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton SF View Post
 

 

Reading about your Sky Valley Sriracha sauce made me hunt for it and in the hunt I found this interesting article. Thanks. :)

The Sriracha Cha-Cha

 

Right on, thanks man!  Need to hit up the local Asian-mega-marts and find that Aroy-D.

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