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how many of you guys cook??? - Page 111

post #1651 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post

ME GUSTA 
Those MEME quotes are all over but now you can have a tasty and delicious ham,cheese,lettuce and Trollface sandwich!



If you can't eat Lobster,ham has to be the next best thing.
Cured Spanish Serrano Ham,Italian Parma Prosciutto,Tennessee & Virginia Honey Hams...
Of course the best,slow smoked,barbequed pork shoulder on my little cooker:

post #1652 of 2857

Mayo home made! 

post #1653 of 2857

Coming back to pineapple and ham...I hate it because it reminds me of the late 60s/early 70s when Germans(thats what I am)caught up with international/american cooking and thought THIS IS IT!

Do like pineapple and ham by itselft though!

post #1654 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by silversurfer616 View Post

Coming back to pineapple and ham...I hate it because it reminds me of the late 60s/early 70s when Germans(thats what I am)caught up with international/american cooking and thought THIS IS IT!

Do like pineapple and ham by itselft though!

Now I want some :[

post #1655 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by silversurfer616 View Post

Coming back to pineapple and ham...I hate it

Here is some pure Oktoberfest fare just in time,slow roasted Pork Hocks:



Score the skin, all over, with a sharp knife.
Rub the hocks with rock salt and leave on a bed of rock salt, uncovered, in the fridge for a few hours.
Remove and brush off the rock salt.
Use your hands to rub with olive oil, then rub in ground salt.
Preheat the oven as hot as possible (normally about 500F).
Once hot, put the hocks in a baking tray and roast in this very hot oven for about 20 minutes,or until the skin starts to blister.
Reduce heat to 300F, and cover the hocks with foil, forming a tight seal to keep in the moisture.
Roast for another 2 hours,or until the meat is very tender and ready to pull away from the bone.
Remove the foil and reserve the juices for a gravy or jus.
Place the pork under the broiler to crisp up the crackling,turning as necessary.

I will use the meat,bones and drippings in a fall root vegetable soup tomorrow.
Pork Cracklings for life!
Edited by 5aces - 10/17/12 at 2:53pm
post #1656 of 2857

Thats......IMPRESSIVE!!!!

Hope you got a nice beer to go with it....and mashed potatoes is very nice too....with the pork,of course!

post #1657 of 2857

Chicken Satueed in a spicy peanut suace, with White Rice [cooked in 50/50 chicken stock and Water]

 

Nothing like left overs... sadly our fridge is without any veggies so e.e meat and rice YAY

 

Btw that peanut sauce was made from scratch <3, a little reduction of a mix of ingrediants, then I cooked my chicken a little to get it warm [got a little fond on the pan to] deglaze with sauce OM NOM NOM

 

Would have like a green onion garnish though :[


Edited by Mshenay - 10/17/12 at 6:23pm
post #1658 of 2857

For those who cook, how much time do you spend on average cooking ? 

post #1659 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

For those who cook, how much time do you spend on average cooking ? 

 

I think the answer will always be it depends.  For most weeknights, coming home after work, I would stick with dinner options that take no more than 30-60 minutes.  On the weekends when I have more time, I don't mind cooking longer roasts or braises, or baked goods.  Make sure I get all my prep done first (cutting and measuring), have all ingredients at the ready and just cook. 

post #1660 of 2857


As a Bachelor,I work off a couple of lists similar to above.
If I am cooking,quality ingredients are a must and I will spend the maximum amount of time on hand to prepare a recipe accordingly.
Doing a proper barbequed beef brisket can take 14 hours on a smoker and I enjoy every hour of tending the meat to completion.
When pressed for time,sometimes a peanut butter and honey sandwich with a glass of cold milk fills the gap between a great meal.
Next level would be to cook some Canadian Peameal Bacon on a Kaiser Bun with good mustard.
It's always about the next great meal you have the time to prepare...

Savory foods,paired beverages,fine music and someone to share these with makes for a wonderful life.
Edited by 5aces - 10/18/12 at 12:29pm
post #1661 of 2857
Quote:

Savory foods,paired beverages,fine music and someone to share these with makes for a wonderful life.

beerchug.gif

post #1662 of 2857
I like my food crazy spicy, so I usually like to keep some hot peppers around (fresh if possible, or frozen, since my garden yielded a few gazillion ghosts, habaneros, serranos, and jalapenos this year). You can throw them into just about anything savory, and even some sweet things (like sweet sauces).
 
Apart from that in my case, I think that list is a pretty good general guideline for the basics of what you'll usually need for just about any recipe. Of course the odd ingredient is sometimes called for, and that requires preparation beforehand, but that's always the case.
 
Typing all that, now I want to make my stir fry. Apparently it's really good because people keep asking for it whenever they come to visit. Sadly, it's never quite as good when I make it for others because for some odd reason most people don't like their food so hot their nose runs and their eyes water.
post #1663 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by daigo View Post

 

I think the answer will always be it depends.  For most weeknights, coming home after work, I would stick with dinner options that take no more than 30-60 minutes.  On the weekends when I have more time, I don't mind cooking longer roasts or braises, or baked goods.  Make sure I get all my prep done first (cutting and measuring), have all ingredients at the ready and just cook. 

 

Yeah, I just wanted to get an estimate of how much time it generally takes....I find cooking for a single person (myself) a bit of a hassle, so I mostly do with bread, cheese and smoked meat. Fruits occasionally, and veggies sometimes (salad or something). 

post #1664 of 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argyris View Post

 Sadly, it's never quite as good when I make it for others because for some odd reason most people don't like their food so hot their nose runs and their eyes water.

Ahh lucky you, your garden is full of peppers. I cook for my family and it's always to spicy for them... even if I'm TRYING to tone it down, thankfully runny noise and watery eye's are all i get <3 although I've always wondered what sweaty plams is like... although I think that's a symptom for ppl whose stomachs are unable to handle the spice [seeing as the palms sweat then they puke xD] 

post #1665 of 2857

I love cooking but I find I'm unable to make something the same twice... I like to experiment each time, so even something as simple as spag bol with always have twists involved. Because of this my wife doesn't allow me to cook very often... and thats actually a shame because I don't mind.

 

She doesn't like spicy stuff, so I have to cover everything in jalapenos tongue_smile.gif  

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