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Wagner Operas Favorite Recordings - Page 2

post #16 of 150
Speaking of Böhm and Wagner: How is the "Dutchman" with Stewart and Jones on DG? I've been resisting the temptation to buy it.

Jeffery
post #17 of 150
Thread Starter 
My only Hollander is Solti, which isn't terribly good, but I'm not a terribly big Hollander fan, so it's a good match.

Gramophone seems to like the Bohm recording on DG. They are rather impressed with Ridderbusch's Daland, which is probably right, but take Gramophone with a pinch of salt for the rest of it. Arkiv has it for $24.49, so it's a good bargain.
post #18 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
My only Hollander is Solti, which isn't terribly good, but I'm not a terribly big Hollander fan, so it's a good match.

Gramophone seems to like the Bohm recording on DG. They are rather impressed with Ridderbusch's Daland, which is probably right, but take Gramophone with a pinch of salt for the rest of it. Arkiv has it for $24.49, so it's a good bargain.
Thanks. Maybe I'll just splurge. I like Böhm and Jones, so I probably won't be disappointed.

The only two "Holländer" recordings I've heard are the Kowitschny on Berlin Classics (originally released on EMI) and the Dorati on Decca (originally released on RCA). I love the Konwitschny, which has a phenomenal cast---Fischer-Dieskau, Frick, Schock, Schech, and Wunderlich (!!!)---and is very exciting.

Jeffery
post #19 of 150
Some fun Wagner odds and sods:

1. Glenn Gould - Wagner Transcriptions - If you can find this, it's really cool to hear him play a solo piano version of the Meistersinger overture, and several others as well. The disc also includes his conducting debut, with Siegfried Idyll.

2. Wagner for Brass - Members of the BPO and the Bayreuth Festival Orchestra, along with the Canadian Brass. Extremely fun listening, brass-choir arrangements of Wagner themes. Also hard to find but worth the effort if you are inclined toward brass music.
post #20 of 150
Thread Starter 
Back to the '35-'38 Walkure set (now on Naxos, but originally HMV, I think):

It's worth it to hear Hans Hotter in his prime as Wotan. He really gives it a good go for Solti, but his voice is just about used up for the Solti Walkure. He gives a standout performance for Seidler-Winkler. I don't know if he quite matches Schorr, but he isn't far behind.
post #21 of 150
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
1. Glenn Gould - Wagner Transcriptions - If you can find this, it's really cool to hear him play a solo piano version of the Meistersinger overture, and several others as well. The disc also includes his conducting debut, with Siegfried Idyll.
I found this, after some searching, at the local B&N. Buy this if you find it. It's in the Sony Classical Glenn Gould Edition. The remastering is nice, SBM before Sony decided they liked DSD more (cf. the '81 Goldberg re-release). There is a vibrancy here that I think Wagner would have appreciated. The Meistersinger prelude is simply brilliant. I was partial to Levine's reading on the '93 Overtures and Preludes disc, but I think Gould comes very close to the essence of the piece. The contrapuntal structure is laid bare in a revealing and intriguing manner. This disc is absolutely essential for the specialist or the Gould completist only, but it is worth it if you can find it.
post #22 of 150
Taking about transcriptions, someone listened to Uri Caine's Wagner E Venecia?
For me it's at least strange music.
A small jazz ensemble playing wagner. Some tracks sound envolving but others seem to me (like the Overture of Tannhauser) that lose their magic.
post #23 of 150
Talking about Tannhaüser, has anyone here seen the movie "Meeting Venus "? It's about the trials and tribulations of producing a concert version of the opera somewhere in Alpine Europe, the rivalries and backstage stories of the singers and conductor and most of all about the music. It's also supposed to be a metaphor for the formation of the European Union (although it may not work so well on that level). anyway, Kiri te Kanewa sings for Glenn Close and it's problably the best dubbing job in existance in movies. One of my friends is a chorus master for the Metropolitan Opera and she loves the movie. She told me that the things that go on at the Met are even worse than the stuff shown in the movie.

post #24 of 150
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shosta
Taking about transcriptions, someone listened to Uri Caine's Wagner E Venecia?
For me it's at least strange music.
A small jazz ensemble playing wagner. Some tracks sound envolving but others seem to me (like the Overture of Tannhauser) that lose their magic.
No, I haven't heard that. It sounds interesting enough.

My thought on stripped down or transcribed Wagner is that one should take it on its own terms. I don't look to the Gould for my reference Meistersinger interpretation (although, it is my favorite recording of the moment). Such versions are going to lose something of the original. Wagner wrote big and intended his music to sound big. Smaller, more intimate interpretations are nice, but they must be seen as independent musical works.

My rule is: would Wagner have approved? In many cases, I think he would have.
post #25 of 150
I'm surprised that the Karajan set is missing here: for headphone listening it has by far the best sound of any Ring available. The orchestral sound is sumptuous, spacious and thrilling. To my ears, the Solti is too raw and agressive -- any you can hear every splice.
Then: for Meistersinger Varviso on Philips is superb. Lohengrin gets a nod for Kubelik, Parsifal I like Karajan, and Tristan has to be Furtwangler (mono and all!).
And on DVD, I really like Boulez, truly the first digital recording. THe pacing is faster than the norm, the singing consistently good, the sound great and the staging interesting...but not for everyone.
post #26 of 150
Thread Starter 
I'm not a big Herbert von Karajan fan. Therefore, I want his set, but only out of a completist impulse.

Marek Janowski's RCA set is probably the single all-around best Ring (cast, sound, conducting, orchestra). It was also the first digital studio Ring (started in 1980, the year after Boulez at Bayreuth). Solti is still top-dog, but it is not perfect (sound and cast, Solti is really good on the podium, though). Furtwangler's La Scala Ring would be the best if the sound weren't execrable. Furtwangler is the only conductor to my knowledge that has ever been inside the story and the music.
post #27 of 150
I've been listening to the Goodall a lot lately, and I just wanted to recommend it agian. If you can stand the broad tempi, the details of the orchestration really shine through. The third act of Walkure is nothing short of amazing.

Oh yeah, and it's in English...which probably prevents it from getting a fair hearing in many circles.
post #28 of 150
Thread Starter 
I think Wagner would be rather thrilled that they're singing his operas in English. That way, I imagine Wagner would think, more people can hear and appreciate the master.

They're neat, from what I've heard. The broadness grates on me a bit, but I am a hardened Boulez acolyte when it comes to Wagner, so I need quick, compressed tempi.
post #29 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
No, I haven't heard that. It sounds interesting enough.
Uri Caine have several disks in Winter&Winter record label. About Mahler, Wagner, Bach, Beethoven.
I like specially the transcriptions of Diabelli variations played by Concerto Köln: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...703278-3509444

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
My rule is: would Wagner have approved? In many cases, I think he would have.
When I listen to a transcription I would like to delete my knowing about the 'original'. To keep an open mind and answer the question: Do I like this what i am listening?
post #30 of 150

Another preview from the upcoming Gramophone...

...discussing the new Domingo Tristan about to be released (I love the Solti Lohengrin with ol' Placido).

The article makes the case that this will be among the last audio-only opera recordings (to be replaced by DVD's presumably). Not sure if that's true, but it's a sobering thought. I tend to prefer audio operas in some cases, such as when the music itself is the most important thing, or if certain singers are performing

http://www.gramophone.co.uk/newslett...r_domingo.html
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