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Brothers in Vinyl - Page 8

post #106 of 136
So this is a bunch of folks who are getting together to buy parts to put together this insanely awesome dec?
post #107 of 136
Jes,

we have all from first class engineers, known audiophiles with 20 or more years of practice in pro audio, few filozofers .

Thing is that we put out the brainstorming and pick up the best. if you look at the site we allready solved bearing, platter etc. Some of participant are volantery contacting manufactures for motors, other for arcylic platter and so on.

Thats why cost will be cut down to minimum. The quote of the day was" I dont understand why the hell they charge so much for high end turntables?"
post #108 of 136
Oh, well, since that thread was so nicely resurrected, just a little update on my last post: I got both the Dual CS505-4 and the new Dual CS455-1M in the meantime, and both are fairly nice tables for the price. I'd recommend the latter as a priceworthy solution to casual vinyl listeners, who want a decent, easy to use (it's full automatic), universal (speed selector offers 33 1/3, 45 and 78 rpm) record player, while the semi-automatic CS505-4 is a bit better and imo competes nicely with entry-level audiophile tables like the Thorens TD 280 series.

Greetings from Hannover!

Manfred / lini
post #109 of 136
I just found out that my previous one (a B&O beogram 1602) had a problem with the tone arm wanting to travel inward faster then the record groove, thus it appears that it was damaging the left audio track of all my vinyl's (OH !@#$ !).
I have no idea if I can get that fixed, I wish I could.

Thus I picked up a used Technics SL-Q6 turn table for $35. I has a Technics P28 cartridge that has the mount built into the lid and travels in a linear fashion across the vinyl. I was always fascinated by such tracking devices but I never assumed I could ever afford one.
How good/bad of a table is this, and what P-mount audio cartride should I get to replace the P28 (if needed, it has a new stylus and a new belt drive)?

I have been purchasing almost exclusivly vinyl as of late and I have been using the old B&O TT since I adopted the system from my parents. (I also got the Beomaster 2400 if any of you care.)
post #110 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by fetus
I just found out that my previous one (a B&O beogram 1602) had a problem with the tone arm wanting to travel inward faster then the record groove, thus it appears that it was damaging the left audio track of all my vinyl's (OH !@#$ !).
I have no idea if I can get that fixed, I wish I could.
Doesn't the Bang TT have a way of controlling the tracking?
post #111 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by immtbiker
Doesn't the Bang TT have a way of controlling the tracking?
It would be great if I could, but from what I can tell no it can not adjust tracking via a user interface (I do not know if I could take it apart and adjust it that way).
The only user adjustable aspect in which I know of it is the tracking weight for the tone arm.

Not to mention that a new cartride would go for $230 or more.
post #112 of 136
Does it have a eccentric counterweight?
post #113 of 136
It does not have an eccentric counterweigt in which I can see. The lateral axis of movement is inside the enclousure, while the vertical axis is exposed.
In other words, I have no idea how to adjust the antiskating for the tone arm.
post #114 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by fetus
Thus I picked up a used Technics SL-Q6 turn table for $35. I has a Technics P28 cartridge that has the mount built into the lid and travels in a linear fashion across the vinyl. I was always fascinated by such tracking devices but I never assumed I could ever afford one.
How good/bad of a table is this, and what P-mount audio cartride should I get to replace the P28 (if needed, it has a new stylus and a new belt drive)?
Well, my first half-decent turntable was the model below, the SL-5 (without quartz speed control and without the buttons for direct track selection). It was doing ok with the stock cartridge (EPC-P24S, iirc), and then did quite a bit better, after I had replaced that with an Audio-Technica (not sure about the exact model anymore, but I think it was the AT-112EP....).

If your SL-Q6 is in good condition, then it's a nice and easy to use classic tangential table. Still nothing audiophile, mind you - but it won't sound bad at all, at least with a better cartridge. Nowadays, I'd recommend to look into the AT-331LP, AT-311EP or at least the AT-301EP. The L in the 311LP stands for a linear contact needle (and the P for P-Mount/T4P), btw, a more advanced type compared to the elliptical needles (E) of the 311EP and 301EP.

Greetings from Hannover!

Manfred / lini
post #115 of 136
Another question for all the turntable experts: Are there any tangential tables out there (older would be better seeing I am now a poor college student) in which can track coloured vinyl? Mine can not, and thus it is making me second guess my purchase. The person I bought it from would most likely be willing to take it back if I were to purchas a differnet, more expensive turntable (he had one that was pure manual for $100, but it lacked a dust cover).
I have no money for an "audiophile" turntable, so I have to stick in the used market. But thanks for the cartrage recomendation.
post #116 of 136
What makes you say that yours cannot? I thought the only difference between black & colored vinyl was the...erm, color.
CPW
post #117 of 136
I agree. I don't see or hear any tracking differences, between the two.
post #118 of 136
I say mine can not because when I put a coloured vinyl on the table and press the "cueing" button, the scanner travels the distance that it would read for a 7" and then return to the rest position when it should normal detect the presence of the normal black 12" and start playing. When I press the start button the same thing happens. I was able to get the player to read one coloured vinyl once, and when it started playing I noticed that the table was not consistant with the speed in which the platter was turning, thus I stoped the playing.
Are we speeking about the same kind of turntable? One in which uses an optical sensor to read the tracking on the vinyl and controls the audio cartridges movement along the groove?
post #119 of 136
fetus: Uhm, it has what - difficulties tracking coloured vinyl??? Can you describe that any better/more detailed?

Anyway, in advance:

If you hear that coloured vinyl sounds quite a bit worse than most standard records, then you needn't worry: That's just normal - I rarely ever got a good pressing on coloured vinyl. Apart from that, the colour hasn't got anything to do with the tracking mechanism - it can't interfere there: If you look closely at the arm, you might notice a piece protruding on one side - if the arm is pulled forward enough, that piece will trigger (well, actually it'll break the circuit) the optoelectronic sensor of the arm motor, which then will pull the arm forward a bit...

Another problem with coloured lps - apart from worse sound quality in general - on the player could be that the coloured pressings also more often came terribly warped. It that case, you might have to glue down the mechanical sensor in the platter temporaily with a piece of some sticky tape, when the record itself doesn't press it down - otherwise the motor won't start.

So, I say: Can't track coloured lps - blah! Me thinks, the guy just wants to talk you into spending more money, now that he knows you're interested... But me, too: Go and get a better cartridge for that table - that also improves tracking!

Greetings from Hannover!

Manfred / lini
post #120 of 136
I have never talked to him about the problem. Also I have figured out the problem and everything is working well. (Yes I know coloured vinyl is lacking in quality compared to black, but picture vinyls simply impress me to no end and sometimes indy bands put out coloured vinyls for their first pessing or such gimmics like that.)
The problem seemed to be from the vinyl resting too high off the platter due to the standard rubber type mat that came with the table and a cheap anti-static mat in which I had purchased resting between the platter and the vinyl. I removed the rubber mat and placed the anti-static mat on the platter itself. Now all works well. The man (who has been working with the equipment for more then 30 years) said that no problems would have happend with having bouth on at once, but I should have trusted myself. Now time to live happily with this table and purchase a new cartridge.
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