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Orthodynamic Roundup - Page 1520

post #22786 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by bootdsc View Post
 

Short answer: Yes.

 

The price doesn't have to be bad, buy fostex t50rp and any headphone amp will do like a FIIO e17. The t50rp are $129 and well headphone amps can be from $30 to (insert made up super large number). The t50rp also needs new earpads because it comes with real thin uncomfortable pads. I have quite a large collection of audio gear but day to day i use T50rp the most. Its like once you uy a pair there is no point in searching for the perfect headphone anymore because they are good enough.

 

Oh and welcome to the forum, i think you'll like it here.

 

I've seen the review of the Fostex t50RP, and stock and a headphone amp, they seem to sound pretty good and solid, interesting technology, i sometimes ask myself why such technologies never catch the general public, just the audiophilies.

post #22787 of 23454
Simple, really. One is easier to cheapen out and mass produce for the general public.
post #22788 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creato938 View Post
 

it's pretty interesting seeing though this point, what's the development story behind orthos? i always heard that Sennheiser invented them, seems like a pretty big jump in technology to produce them.

Sennheiser hasn't produced a planar in their entire history of Hi-Fi.

 

"Isodynamics", "Planar-magnetics", and "orthodynamics" were first being designed around the late 60's - early 70's. A lot of functional headphones were made but for whatever reason most of them never quite made it to market. The first isodynamic to hit the consumer scene was the Wharfedale ID-1, a huge space-agey monster that was incredibly cheap (would you believe $30 new?) and sounds wonderful even by today's standards when properly amped. 

 

The drive principle isn't as complex as you think. It's a resistive trace placed between two opposing magnets. You can quite easily make an ortho from household supplies, in fact quite a few users have done so. You can make an ortho with seran wrap, fridge magnets, glue, a sharpie, aluminum foil and a trace etching solution.


Edited by takato14 - 4/12/14 at 10:47am
post #22789 of 23454
Quote:

Originally Posted by takato14 View Post

 

The drive principle isn't as complex as you think. It's a resistive trace placed between two opposing magnets. You can quite easily make an ortho from household supplies, in fact quite a few users have done so. You can make an ortho with seran wrap, fridge magnets, aluminum foil and a trace melting solution.

:popcorn:

post #22790 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by takato14 View Post
 

Sennheiser hasn't produced a planar in their entire history of Hi-Fi.

 

"Isodynamics", "Planar-magnetics", and "orthodynamics" were first being designed around the late 60's - early 70's. A lot of functional headphones were made but for whatever reason most of them never quite made it to market. The first isodynamic to hit the consumer scene was the Wharfedale ID-1, a huge space-agey monster that was incredibly cheap (would you believe $30 new?) and sounds wonderful even by today's standards when properly amped. 

 

The drive principle isn't as complex as you think. It's a resistive trace placed between two opposing magnets. You can quite easily make an ortho from household supplies, in fact quite a few users have done so. You can make an ortho with seran wrap, fridge magnets, glue, a sharpie, aluminum foil and a trace etching solution.

 i have seen that some users on the forums built their orthodynamic headphones (and even built some electrostatic ones, amazing), i think it's pretty interesting from the DIY point, but what i really think a lot is how you can make it sound good.

post #22791 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgray91 View Post

Simple, really. One is easier to cheapen out and mass produce for the general public.

 And is sad to note how bad most headphones sound these days, but the general public won't even notice using MP3 or iTunes AAC files.

post #22792 of 23454

Electrostatic drivers are easy but the you need an amp. I think orthodynamic drivers are not easy to make specially the traces on mylar or kapton. Not something you can do at home. Most of user here have mostly transplanted drivers and tuned it.

 

 

post #22793 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuZo2 View Post
 

Electrostatic drivers are easy but the you need an amp. I think orthodynamic drivers are not easy to make specially the traces on mylar or kapton. Not something you can do at home. Most of user here have mostly transplanted drivers and tuned it.

 

 

 

 

Interesting to know that, is it really worthy to transplant the drivers? since you have already spent the money on orthos and most of them sound pretty good already.

post #22794 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by BucketInABucket View Post
 

Hmm, I'll resend the PM then. Edit: can't send you a PM for some reason; it works for everyone else but just not you! :(

 

You are right there, the TDS-5M have a surprising amount of bass to my ears. Still not a whole lot to but certainly a good amount for a vintage.

 

I have TDS-5M and Yamaha HP-2 and my yammys have more bass than TDS. So for TDS is a same like for HP-3 and other orthos - one pair can be bassy and another one not

post #22795 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Creato938 View Post

Interesting to know that, is it really worthy to transplant the drivers? since you have already spent the money on orthos and most of them sound pretty good already.
Ymmv here. Some people think the stock enclosure is the best for the job while others design entirely new ones.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igenich View Post

I have TDS-5M and Yamaha HP-2 and my yammys have more bass than TDS. So for TDS is a same like for HP-3 and other orthos - one pair can be bassy and another one not
Yes, QC was probably very loose especially considering they're Russian clones.
post #22796 of 23454

By the way, where did you get sawafuji's with shipping to HK ? How much it was?

post #22797 of 23454
Random browsing on eBay yielded this listing (posting it as it's a BiN listing and not an auction). I saw there were 4 left and instantly purchased them. I originally wanted them sent to the UK, but by some amazing accident they ended up being shipped to HK. They costed me EUR47.95 as I got to combine shipping.
post #22798 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by takato14 View Post

 

The drive principle isn't as complex as you think. It's a resistive trace placed between two opposing magnets. You can quite easily make an ortho from household supplies, in fact quite a few users have done so. You can make an ortho with seran wrap, fridge magnets, glue, a sharpie, aluminum foil and a trace etching solution.

 

I must have missed something good here. Who has made a complete ortho out of fridge magnets, putting aluminum foil traces on plastic wrap, and glue?

Are there pictures of this creation? (number of the post in this thread?)

post #22799 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefectiveAudioComponent View Post

I must have missed something good here. Who has made a complete ortho out of fridge magnets, putting aluminum foil traces on plastic wrap, and glue?
Are there pictures of this creation? (number of the post in this thread?)

I guess it's possible to make, but a very simple and rustic one, and won't sound that good.
post #22800 of 23454
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefectiveAudioComponent View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by takato14 View Post

 

The drive principle isn't as complex as you think. It's a resistive trace placed between two opposing magnets. You can quite easily make an ortho from household supplies, in fact quite a few users have done so. You can make an ortho with seran wrap, fridge magnets, glue, a sharpie, aluminum foil and a trace etching solution.

 

I must have missed something good here. Who has made a complete ortho out of fridge magnets, putting aluminum foil traces on plastic wrap, and glue?

Are there pictures of this creation? (number of the post in this thread?)

Very interesting, I can't seem to find it again. I noticed it a while ago on these forums but the search isn't turning anything up. He drew a trace on the foil with a sharpie, glued it to the plastic, then melted it off with trace etcher. He made two of them and made a headphone out of it...

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