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Orthodynamic Roundup - Page 1409

post #21121 of 23432

My HP-1 has better bass than the tds-5M but it is the Aniso version so I am not sure if I can generalize.

 

The tds-5M tonally reminds me more of a PMB ortho than Yamaha, it does have better bass than the PMB though.

post #21122 of 23432
Quote:
Originally Posted by nick n View Post

could you point us to the 10 you feel ae adequate sometime?

 

Software versions, but have you tried the hardware versions?


It was actually the hardware that led me to try the software. Tried the headroom amp and a DIY board based on the Meier Circuit and I just don't feel there is enough there to warrant their use. Once again, as in all things soundwise there is personal preference involved. FWIW I think the tunable software versions are marginally better, but still feel they are more of an interference than a performance gain.

 

First off with a bullet is the Stax Space Sound CD. It really is rather the template for what binaural can do. (Also I always wondered what Sabine looks like)

http://www.discogs.com/Mozart-Edition-Vol-1/release/1818660  Anything that was released on the AudioStax Label is worth hunting down. I had the chance to clear out a shops inventory when they closed a few years ago and passed on it, Kicking myself ever since.

Explorations in Space and Time Chesky of Course.

The Martin Luther Chorales over at Binaural Source, if they're still around.

The Chesky demo CD.

Not great but of historical interest are the binaural Elvis tracks that were never released commercially. Similarly Pearl Jams effort just for the context it was used in.

Also Sprach Zarathustra / Saint Saens #3  The Pasedena Symphony Neuport Classic Auricle (this was a limited edition so may be hard to dig up)

 

Doh, Sound of Hand hitting forehead here. How couldI forget Ottmar Liebert's aptly named UP CLOSE  recorded 2007 and readily available. HDtracks has the 24/96 version.

 

There are several Jazz recordings out there that make the cut but are just not my thing.  Fun to listen to once but I do not wish to own them.

 

The thing is, there are a lot of folks out there "recording" binaurally , and a good number of them have not a clue as to how to produce one. There is significantly more to it than either wearing i ear mikes or sticking a miked head in front of the action. A lot of these rely on the Stunt Factor which is to say that a waitress taking a drink order at a jazz club is supposed to be an enhancement to the listening experience. That's not really my cup of tea. (turnabout being fair play here I have a magnificent stereo recording of Janacek completely ruined by a member of the audience sneezing at almost regular intervals, so there are times where it is out of your control) If you are demoing the abilites of binaural thats fine. If you are presenting an artist, that kind of thing just screams bad mike placement (there is a reason the classical guys suspend the Neumann head from the ceiling ) and in my humble opinion detracts from the listening experience. To do it right it is pretty much like any good recording. Musician/instrument placement is a critical element as is the miking and control over ambient noise. In short don't just run out and buy it because it says Binaural on the label. Truth of the matter is there are a lot of "Binaural" recordings out there that cannot come close to recreating  the stage of Solti's Ring in stereo, recorded some 50 odd years ago. When you add to that certain orchestras that insist on releasing their stuff in MP3 format, it just begins to look like a market grab in the incumbent age of the headphone/IEM

 

 I really am sorry if you feel this is an acidic diatribe, there's a lot of Kool Aid going around that I am not drinking right now. At this point in the technology cycle where for the first time in history headphone listening far and away outpaces speaker listening, there is a boom market in audio the like of which no one has ever seen. This of course brings out the wolves who will stick any old thing in that market for consumption. This boom, while overall a very good thing for long time headphone freaks, has brought with it considerable chaff to be removed from the wheat.

 

Caveat Emptor today Caveat venditor next year;)


Edited by Hutnicks - 2/15/13 at 3:24pm
post #21123 of 23432
Thread Starter 

I've long suggested people make their own binaural recordings for the sheer enjoyment of it and to use as a tool to  learn about headphones and what makes them good or not so good at reproducing binaural cues, which should, I've always hoped, lead on to learning what makes headphones good or not-so at reproducing stereo. Some, maybe most, will not be willing to do this, so I mentioned auditioning or, in the extreme case, buying, commercial recordings to accomplish the same goal; thanks for the list.

 

I think the marketplace, as you said yourself, will weed out the koolaid and chaff merchants. 

post #21124 of 23432

Now I am rethinking those quirky JVC(?) binaural recording cans,( simply cannot remember the model number ) If I recall they had microphones in them and a line out recording ability. Though I could be dreaming.

 Thanks for the list.

 

Was also just thinking they would be absolutely useless for recording live events, especially in small venues like halls, not only would they pick up what I find to be the most irritating annoying aspect of going to a live performance----the constant shuffling and sniffing of people who can't seem to sit still  and insist on clearing their throats during critical parts dammit, but I would stick out like a sore thumb with headphones on and a wire leading to a device. 

 

I guess there would have to be a rather large hat and possibly a wig to hide all that.

sorry to sidetrack.


Edited by nick n - 2/15/13 at 1:38am
post #21125 of 23432
Quote:
Originally Posted by wualta View Post

I've long suggested people make their own binaural recordings for the sheer enjoyment of it and to use as a tool to  learn about headphones and what makes them good or not so good at reproducing binaural cues, which should, I've always hoped, lead on to learning what makes headphones good or not-so at reproducing stereo. Some, maybe most, will not be willing to do this, so I mentioned auditioning or, in the extreme case, buying, commercial recordings to accomplish the same goal; thanks for the list.

 

I think the marketplace, as you said yourself, will weed out the koolaid and chaff merchants. 

  Thats good advice not only from the point of evaluating headphones but also to see just what is involved in putting together a recording and all the things that can (and usually do) go wrong during the process. We really are fortunate today to have the technology at the desktop to work with a recording and see what can be done and what effect it has on headphone listening. This will become of even more interest as the recording industry starts to mix for headphone listening. That is pretty much inevitable as the industry follows the technology trend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nick n View Post

Now I am rethinking those quirky JVC(?) binaural recording cans,( simply cannot remember the model number ) If I recall they had microphones in them and a line out recording ability. Though I could be dreaming.

 Thanks for the list.

 

Was also just thinking they would be absolutely useless for recording live events, especially in small venues like halls, not only would they pick up what I find to be the most irritating annoying aspect of going to a live performance----the constant shuffling and sniffing of people who can't seem to sit still  and insist on clearing their throats during critical parts dammit, but I would stick out like a sore thumb with headphones on and a wire leading to a device. 

 

I guess there would have to be a rather large hat and possibly a wig to hide all that.

sorry to sidetrack.

There are alternatives, such as small electret mikes mounted on eyeglasses. There are some interesting bootleg recordings surfacing these days, if you don't mind listening to the guy and his girlfriend to the right having a continuous conversation during the performance. Somewhere in cyberspace is an interview with David Gilmour where the interviewer asks his opinion of those, it's quite funny.

 

Just as a teaser here is a web site with some decent and not so decent demos. To Illustrate a point listen to the thunderstorm recording, what could have been a truly amazing listen is marred by catastrophic technical deficiencies.

http://blakeflannery.hubpages.com/hub/Binaural-Recordings-3D-Audio


Edited by Hutnicks - 2/15/13 at 7:38am
post #21126 of 23432

Sorry, but I think we should stick to Orthodynamic and move binaural discussion in other thread. 

post #21127 of 23432
Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post

Wualta was on about the K 501 using some sort of constructional tricks in the cup to delay the sound waves bouncing back into the ear in order to increase the size of the perceived soundstage. Look that up, too.


??????

 

I've a pair of K401's that I kept over the K701. Would be interested if there's a mod for them.

 

-Dogwan

post #21128 of 23432

Oh Jeez!

 

What have I done? Just pulled the trigger on a pair of HP-3's.  BIN for $59? More than I would normally spend, but seeing the astronomical prices lately made me itchy. And, they looked nice.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281065220898?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649
 

I already have a really nice pair of YH-2's that I got for $40. Perfect headband and nice pads. Which I really like after simple mods.

 

When the HP-3's get here how do I tell if I have the bass light or heavy version? Will I be able to tell just by listening ?

 

I'm sure I will have more questions about best damping scheme when i figure that out.

 

Cheers,

Dogwan

post #21129 of 23432

GREQ ,can I ask how much did the watson or universum cost you?  I saw headphone similar to the two but from different brand.

post #21130 of 23432
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuZo2 View Post

Sorry, but I think we should stick to Orthodynamic and move binaural discussion in other thread. 

Don't worry, we always snap back to OrthoLore. Binaural is apt, because it's usually overlooked and it's a powerful tool, and it's easy to DIY. Besides, one of the sore points of working with vintage orthos is the closing-in of the apparent soundstage/headstage, and the question is, why do they do that?

 

But yeah, if there's a need to delve into the commercial aspects of binaural production and the technical challenges thereto, another thread would be appropriate.

post #21131 of 23432

^ Curiously, the HOK maintain a decent soundstage regardless of some modding, while the HP-50 lose theirs the moment you put anything in the cup.

post #21132 of 23432
Quote:

Originally Posted by wualta View Post
 

Besides, one of the sore points of working with vintage orthos is the closing-in of the apparent soundstage/headstage, and the question is, why do they do that?

 

 

 

 

 

Bass. And you know that's why.

post #21133 of 23432

Ok I'll bite at this one. What is the all time hands down worst ortho for this problem? Has to be some off/unknown brand and I want a pair.  Like Henry Petroski, I have a fascination for bad engineering.
 

post #21134 of 23432
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefectiveAudioComponent View Post

 

Bass. And you know that's why.

No, there's more to it than that, and you know it.

Har.

post #21135 of 23432

A really cool pair , as in 2 different things , of new mods that are very well done.  HP-1 drivered Pioneer vintage and a custom wood cupped T50rp, though you would never know it by looking at it.  Commendable work and very easy on the eyes , except the mask shots lol. Well done.beerchug.gif

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/651515/my-diy-orthodynamic-headphones#post_9171059

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