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Posts by Nazo

So I'm using a DC-DC converter to allow me to use a lithium-ion battery (specifically a Panasonic NCR18650, so in theory I can get at least a good 2600mAh or so out of it before the voltage drops below the usable range -- probably around 2800mAh really) with my CMoy. If it produces any noise I'm unable to hear it (I'm fairly certain it's outside of the range of the filtering that even a CMoy does really.) Anyway, this means I can tune the voltage to whatever I want...
I'm not sure if this is the best place to ask, but here goes. I just got an HD650 hoping its sound signature would be more like what I got from the HD555 I modified the heck out of but with the higher quality, lower distortion, etc etc of a higher end headphone. After looking at a lot of things (particularly sound response curves on HeadRoom) it seemed like the HD650 might be about the right balance of things for me with a response curve not so terribly different from...
EDIT: Moved to a more appropriate separate thread.
Except right there is a perfect description of where preventative measures would be the perfect solution. You can keep sanding it down more and more making it harder and harder for it to fully contact eventually and making it a fair bit of labor every time, or just protect it once and likely never touch it again. Of course, I'm recommending a protection, not a cleaner. The cleaner is no good as a long term solution because even as you get the layer of oxidized material...
Just one problem. They aren't marketed towards audio applications. No one that sells audio equipment says "and by the way, you should get this." In fact, I'd go so far as to say that I doubt any audio-specific sites/markets even have No Ox, though many likely do have deox cleaners. (If anything it's almost more in their best interest for you to buy those cleaners on a regular basis. I still haven't even scratched the surface of this "small" 2oz tub of No Ox and likely...
Are you sure you searched right? You can start by looking at people talking about battery terminals in cars. That's where something like this is most needed. In such cases it has proven itself before with the biggest problem being the heat (not applicable to most audio setups. Maybe vacuum tubes perhaps could get hot enough.)You make no sense. My usage example is of it having worked in said application (ok, not $1000+ equipment, but not exactly the cheap junk you find...
That would probably be mineral oil. A very thin oil that can protect almost any metal -- for a short while. It seems to come off over time for everything I've ever used it on (very handy on things like blades, scissors, and etc though as with the oil getting into the pores and such it makes them act like they are a lot sharper thanks to the reduced resistance at the small scale.) It's exceptionally non-conductive to electricity (though ironically it can absorb a lot of...
Again. REALLY THIN coat. I think I've said it three times now. It's mostly just a matter of making those tiny pores in the metal's surface (the sort you need a really really good magnification to see) less resistant. And yes, not conductive enough to be used as a signal path. Mega-ohm or higher resistance over significant distances (significant being millimeters or less. I tried to test with my multimeter as close as physically possible without the leads actually...
Again: its conductivity is not very high. Even if you smear a large amount (and didn't I say multiple times it's a very very thin layer?) it's not conductive across distances such as two separate contacts. No crosstalk. None. At voltages like even speakers use the resistance is too high to travel across close connectors. At voltages like line connections and headphones use, even the poles of a 3.5mm TRS connector appear to be too far apart for conductivity between...
I'm not talking about stuff like Bluray players or projectors obviously. This is Head-Fi, remember? People here still use headphones made thirty years ago or vacuum tube amplifiers or other such things, many of which are decades old made back before everything was gold plated and such. Among sound equipment, usage of older things is very much not uncommon. And if you're not buying headphones that you mean to last a long time you're probably in the wrong place. Just as...
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