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Posts by tangent

 Yes.  In the "Reply" composition area, the toolbar above the message box has a button for this.  Thanks for posting it.  It looks like it should work. You might want to give it a different name, though. Virtual ground is pretty essential to the "PIMETA" nature. Also, I've always thought of the PCB as an essential part of each project's identity. You will necessarily have to come up with a different design for this one, so you're getting into something that needs its own...
 Yes.
 Dunmanifestin.   The world I started DIYing in isn't the one I ended up in at the end of last year, when I shut down my shop. As that world faded away, so did I. (Don't shed a tear for me. I'm fine with this.) Anyway, gods, really? What, I have scriptures now? No, those are just footprints. If you're tired of retracing those footprints, go make some of your own. That's all I was doing, after all.
You're probably not getting any answers because you could have answered all of your questions. I get four pages of results when searching this forum for "NE5532 cmoy". The voltage question is covered on my site, and battery chargers are not only covered in several places on my site, they come up here regularly, too.   How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
Perhaps you would draw up your new stripboard layout and post it publicly somewhere? You're surely not the only one who's had to come up with their own.
Isn't the -IN on each side of the op-amp connected to virtual ground via those jumpers at the wing edges of the board?
 In that case, you probably have high DC offset, which you should have tested for with a voltmeter before plugging your headphones in. If the DC offset is low with the headphones out but rises when you plug the headphones in, the amp is probably oscillating, which you can confirm by measuring the amp's current draw. The overheating case typically causes time-varying repeating clicks which may settle on a pattern as the system reaches thermal equilibrium, not just a single...
 Clicks usually indicate that it's running into its thermal limits and shutting down. If that's it, the most likely cause is a short somewhere. You acknowledge dodgy soldering, so perhaps watching my soldering tutorial videos will help. (Yes, folks, they're on Vimeo now, so no longer squashed to 320x240. Yay.) If you can't find it on your own, posting high-res pics of both sides of the board will often work, as we can tell you where the problems are.  Within reasonable...
Soldering tutorials. (Including desoldering.)   If this is a 50 cent regulator, I'd just cut it off the board, desolder the pins individually, and buy another.   (Or pull another from the bin, because you're building a collection of parts now, right?. )   If this regulator is expensive enough to be worth saving, I'd use the solder blob method.   (Don't ask me what that is, watch the videos.)
You might have gotten lucky that way, but you have to realize that what you have there is truly a one-off item. If you were expecting someone to just know how to fix it from experience, the only one with direct experience with that specific build is the person who built it.   I and others here do know the PIMETA v1 and v2 circuits, but what you have there isn't that. It's kind of like saying "I have a Chevy" when what you actually have is a Baja buggy that was built on a...
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