New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Balisarda

You know, funny thing is I can't remember whether the Electrocompaniet EMC-1 (list about $4500 six years ago) I have back in Boston is as musically engaging as the Apollo! With my Apollo experience under my belt, you can bet I'll do some serious listening to the EMC-1 when I get back in a couple weeks. I'm hoping that if I don't like it I may be able to trade it for a Rega Saturn. Possible?
I got ahead of myself. My HD2 hasn't even reached the building stage yet (according to the queue on MAD's website) and I already bought several NOS 5751 and 12BH7(A) tubes for tube rolling! I am SOO looking forward to the arrival of this amp!
Do you all use shielded interconnects? If not, the interconnects are probably to blame for picking up radio stations. Interconnects can act like antennas, picking up RFI, EMI, etc. and transmitting it into the amp. The Rega has an aluminum case, so it seems unlikely it's the culprit. Blue Jeans Cable uses a double-braid shielded cable for its interconnects. The owner tested several varieties of shielding and found that to be the best.
"overture audio is great, except when you want to buy" I wouldn't know about that yet, since I'm still trying to assemble the funds for that Apollo! "step from Apollo to Saturn is NOT diminished return if you have the right equipment to take advantage of Saturn" By diminishing returns, I meant that the four players I listened to were each priced in $200-250 steps from each other, but the Saturn (the next step up from the Apollo in Overture Audio's offerings) is a...
I spent several delightful hours today at Overture Audio in Ann Arbor, MI, listening to CD players. James and Andrew set up four players for me to compare: a NAD C525BEE ($300), a NAD C542 ($500), an Arcam CD73 ($750), and a Rega Apollo ($1000). (Prices are approximate.) I’d been considering purchasing the NAD C525BEE and wanted to hear whether it offered an improvement over my computer-as-source. I offer my impressions. Associated Equipment The downstream...
I owned both the DT 880 and the PROline 2500 for a 30-day trial. Both have prominent treble that fatigued me, though I found the PROline's rather worse than the DT 880's. The DT 880 has too little bass for my taste; the 2500 has even more bass than my HD 650! Even so, I think I preferred the DT 880, but don't hold me to that.
Frank purchased my SAA Equinox cable, paid promptly, and was a pleasure to deal with. You can't ask for more. I'd do business with him again any time.
Quote: Originally Posted by gradofan Sad news... since I'm broke and going to Germany for three months, my beloved DAC1 and DEQ are about to ship out to other headfiers . . . I'm cutting back to my less-than-dreamlike, still-very-nice setup. . . . As it stands: Head-fi Name: gradofan At least no one can take away your Head-Fi name, no matter how far you cut back your setup!
I think high gain just increases the voltage gain in the amplification stages. It's for high-impedance headphones, which need greater gain to achieve a given volume than low-impedance headphones. Higher gain can cause higher levels of noise in sensitive low-impedance headphones, though, which is why IEMs and Grados usually use the low-gain setting. I think distortion also gets greater as voltage gain climbs. I'm not sure why the Shure sounds better with the high-gain...
I think I know a little part of this. Vacuum tubes by themselves have a very high output impedance. That would be bad for driving speakers or any kind, because the impedance mismatch would cause a lot of stacking and treble roll-off. Using a transformer is one way of stepping down the impedance to something useful for driving headphones and loudspeakers. But some people think transformers color the sound of the signal or make the amp more sluggish in reponding to signal...
New Posts  All Forums: