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Posts by jdpark

Yes, he does the Walzes, Variations and all the Mazurkas...  Yeah, it seems that many of his recordings in the 1980s and 1990s are hit-or-miss, but his stuff from the 1960s, and some of the 1970s material seems to be better... He's one of the better Scriabin interpreters (though not the best), and not bad at Rachmaninoff. I think despite his strength as a player, he actually tends to sound over-excited with the big passages and actually comes across as a more intelligent...
Does anyone have the 17 disc set of "Complete Chopin" works by DG?   I just checked it out from my library and started off with Disc 5 of Mazurkas played by Ashkenazi. To my ears the album is fine, though not mind-blowing. The librarian said he particularly liked the Ashkenazi recordings, which surprised me somewhat, since he and I often agree on recordings and I'm generally not a huge fan of Ashkenazi. Then I read a review on Amazon that actually the Ashkenazi records...
In my experience sibilance occurs when the DAC is not very good, or with MP3 files. Sometimes the amplifier could be to blame, as well. I don't think analytical headphones are to blame if everything else is working properly. I haven't had problems with sibilance outside of a few compressed Pop CDs I purchased by mistake in the 2000s like "Queen's Best" or something. I've never had any sibilance with a jazz or classical CD recorded post-1990. Seriously. If there is...
Has anyone tried these with either the C2 by audio-gd or the V200 by Vioelectric?   I'm finding that they do benefit from some good voltage, even though they're technically not hard to drive at all. Listening to some acapella music with them from a vintage receiver using my Lehman BCL as a pre-amp and getting crazy good results. Soundstage is huge, and voices sound amazing.
  That's exactly what I would suspect, since the Ember II is a very powerful tube amp. Many tube amps wont be powerful enough to get the bass going with any kind of authority (even relative to these cans). 
Interesting :)    I'd suppose there is a more 'masculine' and a more 'feminine' way to play some music on some instruments, when heard by a common listener. But this is not necessarily going to be applied to biological male or female musicians... I suspect. Some men might have a more feminine approach and vice versa. But professionals know that any musician can put on the affect of masculine or feminine, and often a very good musician can do both, just like a good actor...
There are too many to choose from, but mainly you need one with the ability to feed at least 400mW into 120 Ohms. So a very powerful one. I find the Schiit Magni to be fine as a basic amp that does the job. Then you can go up from there, the C2 by Audio gd is supposed to be good, as are the Vioelectric and Lake People amps. Because they are not very sensitive to Ohm output, you can also use vintage equipment that doesn't work very well for more sensitive cans, like...
thankfully! I have the HD650 and can't stand how claustrophobic they make me feel on a lot of music, even with a good source and amp (which granted does help somewhat). They are good for folk, blues, some rock, and some solo or chamber music... Basically anything with five instruments or less. Also, they are not that detailed really. My Beyer DT150s blow them away in the clarity of the detail. When I go back to the HD650 I feel like someone put a fuzzy cloth around...
Yeah, I'm interested as well. Seems like they get very mixed reviews due to uneven treble response. The K501 does have a bit of upper treble roll off that can make some genres seem off. It also has a roll off in the sub-bass category, so in all it would be perfect if it was just a bit more extended on top and bottom, with a slightly sharper picture coming through. Compared to my Beyer DT150s the K501 is not as clear, but it is more musical in the mids and upper mids, with...
Listening to a great album in 24/192... The last Scottish Ensemble's Debussy-Takemitsu with unique arrangements is outstanding. I haven't listened to many Debussy quartet, and only very recently got into Takemitsu, but this is really fantastic to my ears. The dynamics and tonal purity across the spectrum make this album one to be heard even if you hate this particular music (which I would find hard to believe). I think many contemporary fusion-lovers will like this album...
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