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Posts by PleasantSounds

 This depends on your setup. I have 3 installations and each requires different settings. 1000 ms is a good starting point, but my main PC requires 1200 ms to completely avoid buffer underruns, especially when heavily multitasking.My tablet is happy with 400 ms, but that's a much newer architecture and I don't use it for things like video rendering while playing music. From my experience the right buffer size has two boundaries: one is when pops and clicks start getting in...
 Yes it does:- music in these formats tends to be more expensive and not that easy to find- it takes 10 x the space of a redbook CD- it forces your PC to work harder- pops and clicks are more likely to happen That's as much as can be objectively ascertained. The impact on sound quality is debatable at best. Personally I know that with my aging ears on my fairly high end equipment I can't tell them apart from 24/48kHz copies made off the same master. There are those who...
 In generic terms latency is a time lag between cause and effect. In f2k it may surface as a delay when adjusting volume, EQ settings or other DSP functions it performs. You cannot set it to a specific value - it is a side effect of things that have to happen between reading the data from a file and sending it to the DAC. Indirectly you can reduce latency by keeping buffer sizes to a reasonable minimum (without causing pops and clicks) and not going overboard with your DSP...
Just a guess, but if you're boosting the highs in EQ it is possible that they distort. If that's the case then try lowering the lower frequencies and leaving highs at 0.
I'm not sure if you can gain anything in terms of sound quality by splitting your setup between two boxes. Streaming music across the network is less reliable than having a local player and it complicates your setup. One thing you're guaranteed to notice is higher electricity bills. What some people do is use older machines as file servers, stuffing them with all the old hard drives they have, linked into one large logical volume (if you do that make sure you have a good...
More info about balanced vs SE can be found in this thread.
Faster slew rate and extra power are the only tangible benefits of balanced amps that I can think of. Maybe reduced crosstalk due to avoided common ground. Noise, THD, output impedance are actually worse than SE, as you have two amps per channel and these things add up. Plus you get some non-linearity between the positive and negative halves (simply due to parts sample variation) and switching noise at the 0 point.    So in theory a very fast and powerful SE amp should...
You can get decent results with Foobar2000 and the Channel Mixer plugin. It allows a lot of control, including stereo base width, volume levels and delays for all the channels. A bit fiddly to get it right but looks like you are after very particular mix and that's what you can get with it.
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