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Posts by analogsurviver

This pollution from (usually switching) power supplies of digital gear does not take either super system or bat ears to be audible Use your own.
If you ever climb up the audio ladder high enough to live with one of the greatest turntables ever made, the Versa Dynamics http://www.versalab.com/server/versadyn/players1.html (any model) long enough to set it up (say over weekend if you are fast - and I MEAN it when I say fast at grasping things ), it is clearly written in the manual. Manual is A4 format book some 4 inches thick ( forget finding it online ).  I did not believe it at first either - but then we started...
Sorry - that is a honest account on things. A really good analog turntable setup can be "sabotaged" by quite an AUDIBLE amount by merely having a CD player in the system - on standby, not even turned on.I remember some Rotel units being particularly nasty about it, but they by no means are exceptions. That's why it is perfectly possible to have better overall results with a CD walkman powered off batteries than with a standalone mains powered on paper far superior CD...
Please don't. Especially if you can measure the line voltage garbage from mains powered computer power supplies with an oscilloscope. The culprit is most likely to be a switching power supply. In case of a laptop, things usually do get better by running the laptop off internal batteries.
IF given the correct data.  CD player is nothing but a computer - with a pretty awkward "storage" system. Susceptible to vibration from multiple sources, resulting in yet more error correction action.These late are completely at random - and can not be reproduced during say another error count test - resulting in two or more different measurements of the same disk.
Must be - using pixie dust ! Even DSD128 still leaves "slight" difference in treble compared to vinyl played live - and it is good to around 50 kHz @ -3 dB. I only have DSD64 rip of the LP in question .
Again, it is HOW the optical disc is read. Are you quite sure your "analyzer" drive in a computer is as good/bad/whatever than the one in your CD player ? What if you "analize" with far worse drive than actually listen to music using your CD ? "Measuring" worse than it really is ? The difference in sound comes mainly from the different level/degree each drive imparts due to error correction system(s). Thus the very same optical disc can be played (or ripped) with different...
16/48 is a tiny bit better than 44.1 - but it is not nearly enough. The difference is so small it is not worth writing home about.
Thank you for mentioning the use - or not use - of the pre-emphasis. This filter certainly can lead to audibly different results. However, it is not the only scientific reason. Some players have adressed these pure optical reading errors better than the others - and the effect is audible even if pre-emphasis is kept constant between the original pressed CD and CD-R copy. The same problem occurs at riping - one way or another, data has to be transferred from optical to hard...
Still struggling with my Stax Lambdas - hopefully, will be back online soon.
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