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Posts by analogsurviver

No, I am refering to my ancient vinyl copy. Frankly, having heard Telarc decade(s) before, I was really wondering what all the fuss was about Mercury/Dorati recording. Still, it should be no match for Telarc in sheer sonics department - bass and loud is not something even I could complain about in CD ( strictly speaking, it was a Soundstream http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soundstreamrecorder used, which has a bit better sampling frequency, 50 kHz, comparable to later DAT....
Frankly, I do not know/remember. The iFi designers have covered this too, but it is burried within the thread...
Mercury with Dorati vinyl is nowhere near being equivalent even to the kitty meow compared to a lion pack roar of the Telarc with Fennel recording - regardless on which sound carrier it is. So, I believe that CD is better. But considering the level of underachievement with this particular LP, it should not be hard at all to improve with CD.
Not in this case - this recording is as it is and re-recording it to other medium means simply trying to preserve as much of the original as possible. The difference to any normal symphonic orchestra music is the fact that the cannon shots are a considerable difference in volume/loudness above that of music - much like the real thing. Do I understand correctly that below is A NEW TELARC RECORDING of 1812 - or is it 1978 master > etc ? CAUTION for those not already familiar...
True on all counts. Micro uses two DAC chips of the same type, each for one channel in dual mono - and so can reach DSD512 or octa-speed and corresponding DXD.
Micro is no longer the only octa speed DSD DAC - for a "small difference" you can get  http://www.enjoythemusic.com/superioraudio/equipment/0814/gryphon_audio_designs_kalliope_dac.htm
According to iFi+, newer chips are no go - they can not make use of this/similar XMOS treatment. That is why they use this "vintage" PCM1793 chip - it offers things current generation of chips simply lack.
Somehow, the second photo of the Telarc cannons on vinyl has failed to show up - now please see the original post edited. According to all specs of the recording equipment, 1812 at these levels should have been Mission Impossible - but that was not the case. Be it as it may, these grooves are non plus ultra in analog record mastering in BASS. At the other end of the spectrum, in extreme treble, it was Stan Ricker again who recorded - by fluke/mistake/unintentionally - bias...
There is *somewhere* in this "small & short" thread precisely described how iFi tested each and every DAC chip under the sun and found there were relatively vintage chips capable of better performance than published in the manufacturer's data sheet. And used one ( PCM 1792 IIRC ) that could be "persuaded" using most likely overclocking & who knows what else to allow the published performance. Back then verified by another "Doubting Thomas" with solid knowledge of these...
I too understand that the master digital tape has to be clipped - but what I wrote unfortunately still holds true. Whatever and however the cannons on the LP record recorded - they ARE playable and if the peak on cannon shots is brought to just below 0 dB on 44.1/16 recorder, gets the music waaaaaaaay below normal levels compared to the similar music without cannons recorded to normal CDs. LPs or even MCs for that matter - and it loses in definition soooo badly that it is...
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