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Posts by analogsurviver

True enough. Although music played at the times was inaudible, 96 dB of dynamic range can "just" be squeezed in onto the CD with careful transfer from the analog cassette master tape. But as it was a binaural recording, brick wall filtering of the CD above 20 kHz DOES affect playback; the cassette recorder used is "flat" to at least 22 kHz with a gentle rolloff above - which would have never been heard unless ANY filtering from the HighCom II was removed well in advance of...
Hmmm - in a way, I feel pity for you - for never hearing a recording approaching live enough to fool you into thinking it is live. Let me explain - there ARE good movie soundtracks - but they most definitely do not come from Hollywood or USA more in general. High professional standard, with good and predictable but definitely not you-are-there-quality, yes  -  BUT it takes movie makers from other continents to get a truly amazing audio. Sometimes, Germans use...
Nice of you to post these links - thank you ! I will go trough all these links - and will try to help wherever and whenever I possibly can. There obviously are spots within symphonic orchestra that can be dangerous to hearing. But it is the very nature of loud sounds with rise times too short to be possible to record with redbook CD that differentiate between live and a recording - and it is this speed again that will tell you whether it is real or a recording - even if...
NOT my idea of passing my "spare" time ...
Just a reminder - headphones most probably required for playing back really loud sources ( like rim shots on drums using drum sticks - present in ANY decent acoustic non-amplified jazz set ) :   https://www.audeze.com/products/headphones/lcd-3   But please do not play (the compressed, REGARDLESS of mastering) DSOTM at maximum level these phones can provide...   I have yet to hear of a concert pianist (or any other acoustic instrument player ) going deaf from his own...
No need to exaggerate - those PEAKS last for a very very very short time and do not sound "loud" at all. And yes, they will be the most primary indication whether it is live or recorded - because most of the recordings will tend to clip those peaks off - one way or another. But, if you look for the specs of the microphones - you will be hard pressed to find anything that does not go at least to 125 dB - for a reason. And no, trying to monitor say a grand piano with...
Live music DOES provide for Catch 22 scenarios. The same drummer started off another song with barely audible brushes on both cymbals and "other" drums. Out of "nothing" - and below noise floor of the hall.  And the piano player, Mr. Zoran Škrinjar, a good friend of mine, who despite loosing sight in his mid 30s, continues to play and TEACH playing to this day, has the uncanny ability to play the piano softly so well, despite in classical repertoire or jazz, that people...
129 dB peak values during live concerts are uncommon, but are not that rare. I remember recording a jazz quartet - and setting the recording level best I could during the rehearsal. They said "NO" to the question whether they intend to play any louder during the concert. But in one piece, during the ending of the song, the drummer went crazy - all out. If I were recording to anything else but to what I did ( cassette deck + HighCom II noise reduction ), the recording would...
more of the same. But it is not equally strong - what it lacks, in the very least, is reference to ABX !!!
I see this already got answered.  Packing gear for the today's and tomorrow's recordings - will be back maybe sunday.
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