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Posts by b0dhi

  Higher impedance models use a thinner, lighter voice coil. Ideally the voice coil should weigh nothing.
In these DACs, the clock is generated in the DAC itself and sent back to the PC. This effectively makes the PC just a data source, and jitter of signals outside of the DAC become unimportant (so long as they don't result in data corruption).   In terms of technology, there is some murky water. Most DACs that have the clock generated at the DAC use "Asynchronous USB". However, there is apparently considerable difficulty in getting this to actually work, possibly involving...
  Answers in bold.   I would've thought you guys would jump at the chance to eliminate these PC/Software/Jitter related effects.
  Agreed. This is one of the easier audio questions to resolve. All it would take is someone with a DAC where the clock is generated at the DAC end rather than the PC end, and which is digitally isolated from the PC. Such a DAC would be impervious to any possible software, PC or transport related effects. If someone using such a DAC thought software players sounded different, we'd know it was placebo.
Agreed. But when dealing with oversampling there's always some trade-off. If you use slow roll-off you get higher aliasing. Less aliasing, more Gibbs. And it's not even certain to what extent either of these are audible (if at all). All these (and many other) "issues" would very cleanly disappear if music was recorded at 192khz in the first place. This is a much better solution, IMO, than the very sophisticated research needed to properly address the "audibility"...
Quote: Ah yes, that looks like the best explanation. Matches up pretty well from memory.
    I'm a little puzzled by the slow roll-off. The DAC already implements a brick-wall filter so there's no point in the slow roll-off. It doesn't reduce Gibbs phenomenon since the filter slope is very high anyway, due to the brickwall. I can only guess that either it's a poorly implemented analog filter (unlikely) or it's intentional (also unlikely).   It's also possible that the guy that measured the FR, even though it was sampling at 96khz, had an anti-aliasing filter...
Judging by the oscillator frequency it looks like this is an oversampling DAC after all.
Correct me if I'm wrong but that PCB looks like its been soldered by hand. There's even a pair of bridged pins on the top left.   The two channels are virtually crammed up against each other, which, if the layout isn't effective, would explain the cross-talk. The digital side of the PCM1704s have power decoupling ceramics bypassed with smaller yet further away ceramics, which is just a waste of parts for a package having the parasitic inductance of a SOIC20. The...
  What you say is only true if all of physics, neuroscience and signal theory are entirely "complete" and entirely "true". That assumption is demonstrably false.   Secondly, when you say "Hallucinations aren't truths, they're just perceptions.", it's true but not the complete truth. There have been studies showing that a person's beliefs (though they are false) can result in neural activity that shows the brain reacting as though the belief were physically true. That...
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