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Posts by Bill-P

Reverb is delayed ringing, which is a phase issue, and is thus a completely different "issue", I think. I'm talking about lingering energy after a note is played, or ringing that continues. Imagine cymbal that keeps ringing out, and then the same cymbal played in a reflective room that after being hit, the musician puts their finger there to dampen the vibration, and thus stops the ringing, but the reverb will still exist. I think you are assuming I'm talking about reverb,...
The source does not stop immediately. Real electrical circuits will actually have pre- and post- ringing to some extent, and it may even vary at different frequencies depending on the topology.This can be mitigated by using parts with greater values, more precision (less tolerance), and better linearity, but those are big, chunky, and may not fit into more "compact" consumer enclosures.Here's an article on the "sound" of capacitors that I have been linking to for a...
Cruz is awesome today, too! Actually, better than last week since it rained.   Anyway, I think it's a matter of perception. If low frequencies linger around longer, and high frequencies die down faster, then the listener will perceive the linear frequency response only for a split of a second, but for the rest of the time that the note will be played, it'll sound dark and warm.   Frequency response of an amp is measured typically using a sine wave sweep from 20Hz ->...
Technically, planar magnetic headphones have a flat impedance curve, and as such, they are almost exempt from any interaction with the amplifier (there are some exceptions, but they are quite rare). And yet... if you can detect differences between amplifiers with planar magnetic headphones, then clearly, something else is going on.   So no... an amp is not warm with respect to some headphones. If it's warm, then... it's just warm. Unless either the design is flawed...
Well, I decided not to post this, but... given the context, I guess it's kinda appropriate. This was a graph I made of a HE-560 modded my way (Focus Pads, not Focus-A) versus my modded LCD-2:   Both are somewhat heavily modded, so this graph is actually not representative of neither headphone at stock form... but the LCD-2 is essentially my "perfect" frequency response. The HE-560 after modded is close, but that emphasis at 4KHz is still very audible compared to the...
 Mm... not to derail this thread, but it's a much different sound from the usual Audeze headphones. It's closer to the HD800 or Stax in terms of sound, since I wanted to test some claims that the LCD-2 sounded closer to a Stax SR-007.
 I'd respectfully disagree with this. A headphone's ability to reveal and resolve sonic information is actually not related to its neutrality. In fact, if you look up the frequency response graph of any Stax headphone, you'd see they have weird ups and downs... crazy emphasis (or de-emphasis) at certain ranges, and generally very uneven. Case in point, here's the SR-007 as measured by InnerFidelity:http://www.innerfidelity.com/images/StaxSR007.pdf And yet that SR-007 will...
 Haha, yeah. I think this ties back to my way earlier comments, though. I had a HE-560 with a plastic mounting dish that I got replaced by Hifiman due to the bass rattling issue. That one sounded very harsh in the treble. My replacement came with the metal mounting dish, and I thought... "hmm... this one sounded warm" at the time. But it easily could have been my mind playing trick. The HE-560 I measured had the plastic mounting ring, and I have also noticed on another...
Yeah. Thanks! I'd agree Focus-A should sound warmer to most folks because of the drastic drop at 4KHz. The treble lift above is in a region where most folks are not sensitive (according to equal-loudness contour), and it's fairly clean with no resonance, so it would just sound like "air" or slightly more clarity, I'd say. The 10KHz peak on the stock Focus Pads actually would stand out more depending on how the pads fit on your head, and may account for more of a...
Yep. It should be audible. The difference is as little as 1.5dB, but also as much as 3.5dB at some positions. If you're getting that much, then I think you fall into the 3.5dB group. Different positions on my coupler kinda accounts for different ear structures, and also different ways the headphone fits on most folks. What you're seeing up there applies to me specifically, but other folks will experience the 4KHz and above range slightly different.
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