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Posts by Bill-P

Well, to be honest, I'm actually not so happy that I am so sensitive at those regions, because that means my choice in headphones is extremely limited, and any small change around that region is just bad for me. But then... many headphones in the market currently exhibit a bump of some sort around there.  Ah well, at least now I know how to reduce it further... by playing around with the wires back there. I carefully opened and closed the grill each time, of course. I...
Notice I mentioned I preferred the wires to be where they are, blocking the drivers? And also noticed how I mentioned I thought that reduced the sibilance for me? I could hear that 0.5dB rise around 8.5-9k. If anything, you have just confirmed what I heard, that the wire being where it is is actually preventing the rise around 8-9KHz. And in case you are wondering, yes, I am that sensitive to that region. Very few headphones in existence don't cause my ears to bleed.
Sectional area-wise, I don't think a finger has "a dozen times" more so than the wire. The wire is thick enough to block some of the smaller openings in the metallic magnet structure, so I'd think that should have an audible effect. The fazor is actually just this: http://www.audeze.com/technology/tech-tour/fazor-elements Fazor lies on top of an area that's already blocked, so the effect it has on the sound is minimal, and it is minimal (frequency response graphs would...
It's not "small", though.   The wires from each of the driver baffles in my HE-560 obstruct up to half of the enclosure.       Seriously, if you don't believe me, put a finger up next to the opening in the back, and then tell me the sound doesn't change?   If something as small as "fazor" could make a difference, then that "small wire" would make a difference acoustically because it's diffusing the wave that's traveling to the back.
I found that the difference is most likely due to the fit more than anything, though.   With stronger clamping force, the Focus Pads seem to get warmer.   So maybe try that before running out to purchase new pads?
Well, check the last page or so. I already posted a photo of my pads.
Well, what can I say? I can hear it, so... at least to me, it's audible. Placebo or not. I do use another headphone (my ES10) to compare to make sure I'm not just imaging it, too. It's funny how I was ready to write it off, but it turns out these differences are amplified to my ears.  
I thought it was placebo, so I performed it a few times to make sure. They do affect the upper midrange for me. I think it may be because I am extremely sensitive to brightness in the 6-9KHz region. Plus I do listen to music that exaggerates that region (closed-mic recordings), so that just makes it worse. Even the LCD-2 can sometimes be sibilant to me, so you know how sensitive my ears are. It's because I'm this sensitive to treble that most of the top-tier headphones...
If you open the vent in the back, you'll find the cables coming from the connector into the driver baffle.   Mine are long, and so they obstruct the driver pretty blatantly. I can pull them to the sides and fix them with tape, but then that makes the sound brighter by a good margin.   Seeing as planars are sensitive to dampening, that comes as no surprise to me.   I did bend the headband before, but when the headphone came from Grizzlybeast, it was not as tight as a...
So I was determined to find out why my pair sounded so different...   And after a whole afternoon of experimenting, I think I found the chief cause: fit.   If I bend the headband in so that the clamping force is stronger, then the Focus Pads will sound significantly warmer. And conversely, the Focus Pads A will sound brighter/more strident.   But if I bend the headband out so that there is less clamping force, then the Focus Pads A will sound significantly warmer....
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