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Posts by JaZZ

If you've come to a positive decision, maybe get a used Hugo. There's the For Sale forum.
 You will hardly find a DAC that doesn't oversample (which is the same as upsample) these days, as part of a standard anti-aliasing filter.
The reason why a sophisticated DAC algorithm (as with the Hugo) can have such a major effect is the need for an anti-aliasing filter – because of the sampling rate of 44.1 kHz, thus the steep low-pass filter at 22 kHz at the latest. The filter is needed to prevent aliasing – intermodulation of frequencies higher than the Niquist frequency (½ the sampling rate) with the sampling frequency, leading to mirror images. Sine waves below the Nyquist frequency would look like this...
 And how does it sound?    I already know: better than Hugo and Hugo TT. Even better depth of image, more authentic soundstage, more authority...
 Yes, there's a lot of clipping, but here more clearly in the context of a fuzz guitar (and a drum beat at the same time).    However, it sounds like a heavy-metal tune has to sound: distorted and with massive dynamic compression / peak limiting. With the Hugo I hear distortion more clearly than with the Opera, but it's easier to attribute it to the fuzz guitar, so the listening is more relaxed and less afflicted by doubts (about recording or component clipping).  Think...
 The Hugo doesn't remove the clipping. It's not its task to correct the signal, and it can't differentiate between wanted and unwanted clipping to begin with. For «Seeds of Gold» a maximum amplitude of –0.2 is indicated, which hints to no clipping, but in fact the recording is full of clipped peaks, which could mean that it's been «normalized» to a lower level than originally, maybe during the obvious dynamic range compression.
 I have a hard time finding the critical positions, too. Below just an example (from «Seed of Gold») of how the curves need to be edited to remove the clipping. I can't say that the present corrections have any positive effect, though, it may just be a distorted guitar.    Also, there are thousands of such clipped peaks in this song. In turn audible distortion doesn't always coincide with such high peaks or loud passages. So I would say it's a rather hopeless undertaking,...
I just listened to the linked tracks – with Foobar, via Toslink, 1) through the Corda Opera and its internal DAC, 2) through the Hugo. «Duality» and «End of the line» consist of heavily distorted electrical guitars, apart from that there's no foreign/disturbing distortion with both DACs/amps. «Seed of Gold» and «World painted Blood» have basically the same guitar distortion, but there are distortion components not so clearly attributable to the electric guitars...
 None of these recordings belong to my music collection, sorry. And I have no recording with obtrusive clipping except for the one mentioned. But how can the Hugo make the clipping disappear? I would rather expect that it exposes it even more. If it's really the case, the clipping isn't on the recording but produced by a component of your setup. But somehow I rather suspect the recordings.
 There's a solution, but it's probably impractical, as it would take a lot of time and patience. You could manually edit the waveforms by means of a wave editor. Search for obviously clipped peaks («flat roof» shape) and round them to kind of a sine-wave shape. But I guess there will be too much of them. I was successful with this method with a jazz tune where just one sequence of maybe five seconds was heavily clipped. After editing it sounded just fine.
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