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Posts by JaZZ

  From what I know they did test different headphones new and used – but only with respect to amplitude response.     My above hypothesis explains why.      Only the one under suspicion and within the first 200 hours or so (in my case). .
Break-in of speakers – especially woofers – is a well-known and easily measurable phenomenon. Denying it makes no sense. At best one can ask oneself if it is audible or transferrable to headphones. But on the background of the many reports of corresponding behavior even this attempt is a bit questionable. In my experience most headphones show some sonic changes during the first 100-200 hours. The HD 800 is one of the more conspicuous candidates; in a comparison...
I'm not an amp or electronics expert, but the info I have gathered from audio test magazines makes it look like the distortion pattern is of primary importance for the sonic characteristic of audio electronics – and not so much the distortion intensity, as long as it's decently low.   Transient response is actually a function of frequency response, so an infinitely flat response means perfect transient response – but I wouldn't bet my life on this scenario...
   Yes, but only in the mentioned criterion. As explained, there are other, hard to measure criteria with equal importance (at least to my ears).       Since I don't do DBT, the moments of listening (to music) are my all-time reference. .
Hey, I strongly disagree with your implication that a flat frequency response (plus decently low HD/IMD/noise) automatically means absolute fidelity.   I have auditioned numerous headphone amps with virtually perfect measuring data – and each of them has an individual sonic signature.   So a flat response is one thing (which I attach importance to), but the sonic characteristic of an amp isn't solely defined by it. Let alone resolution, transparency and other subtle...
  These statements call for some rectification. I agree with the first paragraph. The second paragraph is flawed, though. Unlike speakers, headphones are normally incapable of reproducing a (passably) natural soundstage. The main reason is that they can't simulate the direction of the sound sources, which are usually in front of you. The fact that the sound waves are laterally projected into the ears makes for the impression of the music playing in your head – for lack...
  Yes, of course!  It's just that I'm too lazy ...uuhhmm: busy these days!.
You don't seem to understand: There's no objective review! Adding mine would mean adding another subjective point of view – which may or may not conform to someone else's. Whereas you effectively seem to believe that your opinion represent an objective truth... Therefore the corresponding reaction from the forum..
One thing you seem to underestimate is that different ears hear differently, and different persons have different sonic ideals. Otherwise there would be uniform component choices. It may be hard for you to imagine, but one person's ideal sonic characteristic can be another person's sonic nightmare. Note that not everybody claims to have a universally valid hearing and sonic ideal! I for one have owned quite a few Meier amps and know how miserable they sound  – also...
You can certainly imagine that because you say so it's not necessarily the truth to me.  In terms of quality of the amp section, my benchmark is the input signal. Of all the amps I've auditioned the Symphony is closest to the «truth» in this respect in my understanding and to my ears. Your ears or your benchmark may differ. .
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