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Posts by amcananey

 Yeah, I get that. It's just that I think holographic stickers rarely, if ever, prove anything at all. This isn't limited to Sennheiser, it's a broader point. But at least with other products, you might have to send them back to the manufacturer for repair, and the sticker can help the manufacturer avoid costly repairs of counterfeit products. Holograms are also useful in currency and passports, since bank officials and customs officers should be able to spot fakes. But I...
But the judgment as an end-user, on-the-spot, is the only place it matters. THAT is where Sennheiser is potentially missing out on a sale, and THAT is where the buyer is handing over his/her money. The only other place that the sticker COULD be relevant is if/when I have to send my headphones in to Sennheiser for repair. But, a) As I already said, I don't need to send my headphones to Sennheiser for repair, I can just get the part from Sennheiser and repair it myself. b)...
My point is just this: 1) You can't see the sticker from outside the packaging. 2) Even if you could see the sticker, how would you know what an authentic Sennheiser hologram sticker would look like? spurxiii just took a closeup picture and I still couldn't tell what it looks like. He said it looks like the Sennheiser logo. I doubt it would be hard to fake a hologram of the Sennheiser logo. Maybe it wouldn't pass muster with Sennheiser, but to any layperson about to buy...
Wait...I just remembered...with my HD650s at least (since sold), the packaging was foam, inside a cardboard box, with a cardboard sleeve around the outside. You couldn't even see the HD650s, let alone a small hologram inside the driver housing inside the box inside the sleeve!
LOL. Was it even visible in the packaging? I don't see how that would stop anything...
 Well, yeah. But nobody is going to not buy a pair of headphones that otherwise appear to be HD650s just because they have a holographic sticker that is slightly different from what an "authentic" sticker is supposed to look like (and, in fact, they won't even know what the sticker is supposed to look like). Moreover, the sticker is apparently insider the driver housing...what are the odds that anyone will get a good look at it from outside the packaging anyway?If...
 I couldn't care less about stickers, holographic or not. Frankly, I don't look at my headphones, I wear them. And my eyes can't see my ears.
Meh. 1. I've never heard of a counterfeit HD600. If someone could produce headphones that sounded just like the HD600 for less, that would be wonderful. 2. Holographic stickers always amuse me. Let me get this straight: you're [I'm talking to Sennheiser here, not FlySweep] saying that someone produced headphones that in appearance and sound are indistinguishable from HD600s, but they can't produce a little holographic sticker? Please...where do you think those...
 I couldn't agree more. Any halfway competent DAC (including the ODAC or a Schiit Modi) coupled with a Bottlehead Crack ($279) will deliver all the performance necessary to make either the HD600 or the HD800 sing. You don't need to spend a fortune, you just need to spend your money wisely on the right gear.
 Well, let's break that statement down:1. The HD650 drivers are upgraded.I would disagree. I find the HD650 drivers to be worse than the HD600s.2. The HD650 drivers are hand picked matched pairs (within 1dB).Do we know that the HD600s are not? When coming out with a new product that is a marginal upgrade over an existing product, but which will cost more, it is not unusual for manufacturers to suddenly list a lot of "new" features of the new product. Only problem is that...
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