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Posts by Armaegis

I'm thinking I might even just sell them. Don't have too much time to spare these days to play with modding, and a bit of extra cash never hurts. Or just trade them for other gear maybe.
So I got my hands on some rare Technics 810 in pretty good working order. Like, still has plastic wrap on the headband. Not too sure what I want to do with these yet... 
  There are a couple of us riding the special monoblock train. Choo choo...
For a shade over $100 you can get a Topping all-in-one speaker amp/headphone amp/dac...
In your review you gave the nod to the Taurus vs the CMA800R in single ended mode, but didn't really elaborate once you went to monos with the Questyles. Do you feel it closes the gap or surpasses?
Solid state for the most part does not care what the load is nor does it care if there's no load attached.   Tube amps can be finicky. As a very general statement, OTL tube amps want to see a specific load for optimum performance. Some transformer coupled amps may have specific desired loads as well. Sometimes, these "dummy loads" are built directly into the amp. But sometimes not. Transformer coupled amps also generally do not like to run without any load attached, and...
Some tube amps want to see a specific load, so your resistor L-pad may need to have a certain config to match the desired output load. If you're going for a high level of attenuation, a three resistor network may be better (one to load the amp, and the other two to achieve attenuation and maintain damping factor)
Usually changing gain involves fiddling with the resistors in the feedback loop which shouldn't have any effect on the output impedance... but I can only guess here.
No one's actually measured the output impedance yet right? Because that 10ohm output is really just the suggested spec from the TP6120A datasheet. They could have used a smaller value resistor, or found some other way to bring it down (I'm just making stuff up here, don't quote me on it).
Output impedace affects damping factor and frequency response.   Damping factor is the ratio of the transducer impedance over the amp's output impedance, and represents the amount of control or "grip" that the amp has on the transducer (there's an article over at innerfidelity that explains this quite well). As a general rule of thumb in the speaker world, you want a damping factor of 8-10 or higher. In the headphone world, the effect of damping factor is arguably not as...
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